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I would like to LEFT OUTER JOIN a second table t2 to a first table t1 when a given condition exists on a third table t3 which is JOINed to the second table t2. If that condition doesn't exist, I still wish to return the records from the first table t1 just like how a LEFT OUTER JOIN normally works.

I've probably totally confused anyone reading this, so I have written two queries which return my desired results.

Is one query more efficient than the other? Is there even a more efficient query which returns the same results?

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/bd56e6/8

SELECT *
FROM t1
LEFT OUTER JOIN
(
    SELECT t2.t1_id,t3.fk
    FROM t2
    INNER JOIN t3 ON t3.id=t2.t3_id
    WHERE t3.fk=123
) AS t2 ON t2.t1_id=t1.id

ID  DATA    T1_ID   FK
1   blue    1   123
2   red     (null)  (null)
3   green   (null)  (null)

EXPLAIN

ID  SELECT_TYPE     TABLE   TYPE    POSSIBLE_KEYS   KEY     KEY_LEN     REF     ROWS    EXTRA
1   PRIMARY     t1  ALL     (null)  (null)  (null)  (null)  3   
1   PRIMARY     <derived2>  ALL     (null)  (null)  (null)  (null)  1   
2   DERIVED     t2  index   PRIMARY     fk_table1_t11_idx   4   (null)  3   Using index
2   DERIVED     t3  ALL     PRIMARY     (null)  (null)  (null)  3   Using where; Using join buffer

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/bd56e6/5

SELECT *
FROM t1
LEFT OUTER JOIN
(
    SELECT t2.t1_id,t3.fk
    FROM t2
    INNER JOIN t3 ON t3.id=t2.t3_id 
) AS t2 ON t2.t1_id=t1.id AND t2.fk=123 

ID  DATA    T1_ID   FK
1   blue    1   123
2   red     (null)  (null)
3   green   (null)  (null)

EXPLAIN

ID  SELECT_TYPE     TABLE   TYPE    POSSIBLE_KEYS   KEY     KEY_LEN     REF     ROWS    EXTRA
1   PRIMARY     t1  ALL     (null)  (null)  (null)  (null)  3   
1   PRIMARY     <derived2>  ALL     (null)  (null)  (null)  (null)  3   
2   DERIVED     t2  index   PRIMARY     fk_table1_t11_idx   4   (null)  3   Using index
2   DERIVED     t3  ALL     PRIMARY     (null)  (null)  (null)  3   Using where; Using join buffer

You will see that the following two queries produce different results:

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/bd56e6/9

SELECT *
FROM t1
LEFT OUTER JOIN t2 ON t2.t1_id=t1.id
LEFT OUTER JOIN t3 ON t3.id=t2.t3_id
WHERE t3.fk=123

ID  DATA    T3_ID   T1_ID   FK
1   blue    1   1   123

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/bd56e6/10

SELECT *
FROM t1
LEFT OUTER JOIN t2 ON t2.t1_id=t1.id
LEFT OUTER JOIN t3 ON t3.id=t2.t3_id AND t3.fk=123

ID  DATA    T3_ID   T1_ID   FK
1   blue    1   1   123
2   red     2   2   (null)
2   red     3   2   (null)
3   green   (null)  (null)  (null)

My schema is below

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS t1 (
  id INT NOT NULL ,
  data VARCHAR(45) NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (id) )
ENGINE = InnoDB;

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS t3 (
  id INT NOT NULL ,
  fk VARCHAR(45) NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (id) )
ENGINE = InnoDB;

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS t2 (
  t3_id INT NOT NULL ,
  t1_id INT NOT NULL ,
  data VARCHAR(45) NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (t3_id) ,
  INDEX fk_table1_t11_idx (t1_id ASC) ,
  CONSTRAINT fk_table1_t3
    FOREIGN KEY (t3_id )
    REFERENCES t3 (id )
    ON DELETE NO ACTION
    ON UPDATE NO ACTION,
  CONSTRAINT fk_table1_t11
    FOREIGN KEY (t1_id )
    REFERENCES t1 (id )
    ON DELETE NO ACTION
    ON UPDATE NO ACTION)
ENGINE = InnoDB;

INSERT INTO t1(id,data) VALUES (1,'blue');
INSERT INTO t1(id,data) VALUES (2,'red');
INSERT INTO t1(id,data) VALUES (3,'green');

INSERT INTO t3(id,fk) VALUES (1,123);
INSERT INTO t3(id,fk) VALUES (2,321);
INSERT INTO t3(id,fk) VALUES (3,321);

INSERT INTO t2(t1_id,t3_id,data) VALUES (1,1,'dog');
INSERT INTO t2(t1_id,t3_id,data) VALUES (2,2,'Cat');
INSERT INTO t2(t1_id,t3_id,data) VALUES (2,3,'Bird');
share|improve this question
1  
Adding some sample and your expected result would be very helpful –  Mosty Mostacho Nov 28 '13 at 17:55
    
This could probably be faster without using the sub-select. –  Axel Nov 28 '13 at 18:00
    
Try running an explain plan on the two queries and compare that output...I think the query plan should be the same. –  Twelfth Nov 28 '13 at 18:02
    
@Axel. How would I not use the sub-select? Wouldn't it filter t1? –  user1032531 Nov 28 '13 at 18:03
    
@user1032531 What do you mean by "filter t1"? You use a left join, so everything in t1 will show up. –  Axel Nov 28 '13 at 18:06

2 Answers 2

Play around with something like this (it's late, so I may haved messed it up somewhat). However you will have to correct the condition ON t3.id=td.t3_id because I don't see any table called td... both in your code and mine:

SELECT t1.*,t2.t1_id,t3.fk
FROM t1
LEFT OUTER JOIN t2 ON t2.t1_id=t1.id
LEFT JOIN t3 ON t3.id=td.t3_id -- please update this condition
WHERE t3.fk=123

Reading your comment above it could be you are rather looking for something like this:

SELECT t1.*,t2.t1_id,t3.fk
FROM t1
LEFT OUTER JOIN t2 ON t2.t1_id=t1.id
LEFT JOIN t3 ON t3.id=td.t3_id AND t3.fk=123 -- please update this condition
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, td was a typo. I think your second query might work. I will test it and post a sql fiddle. –  user1032531 Nov 28 '13 at 18:22
    
Axel, Please see my original posts. I show both these queries and how they produce different results. –  user1032531 Nov 28 '13 at 18:30
    
You get a +1 for showing me SQL fiddle... :-) –  Axel Nov 28 '13 at 22:58
    
Thanks! and some more text.... –  user1032531 Nov 29 '13 at 0:31

Is one query more efficient than the other?

No they generate the same query plan so they should have the same performance. Not assuming the results can be fetched from the Query Cache or InnoDB Buffer Pool..

Is there even a more efficient query which returns the same results?

Well you did ask about it, this query may push you into the right direction... because iám not completly sure if you need this..

SELECT
  t1.id
, t1.data
, IF(t3.fk IS NULL, NULL, t1.id) "t1_id"
, t3.fk
FROM
  t1

LEFT JOIN (
  SELECT 
    t1_id
  FROM 
    t2
  GROUP BY
    t1_id ASC
)
 t2
ON
 t1.id = t2.t1_id

LEFT JOIN 
 t3
ON
 t3.id = t2.t1_id AND t3.fk = '123'

see demo http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/bd56e6/136

The query above also resolves an duplication http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/bd56e6/173 within your query

One less derived table is needed and the type is changed into eq_ref.. This will lead to an better performance because an better lookup is possible with less memory.. note that not are able the remove the full table scan on table t1..

Your requirement/question..

I would like to LEFT OUTER JOIN a second table t2 to a first table t1 when a given condition exists on a third table t3 which is JOINed to the second table t2.

But still the first record sounds more like an relationship (INNER JOIN) to me because this is an matching record based on condition t3.fk = '123'..

If that condition doesn't exist, I still wish to return the records from the first table t1 just like how a LEFT OUTER JOIN normally works.

the next records are the non matches from the table t1... What makes me wondering it should in thoery be possible to write an even better optimized query..

to be continued...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Ray. The query above also resolves an duplication within your query: The row in question of being duplicated isn't really being duplicated as it includes a different t3. sqlfiddle.com/#!2/bd56e6/191. But still the first record sounds more like an relationship (INNER JOIN) to me because this is an matching record based on condition t3.fk = '123'.. But an INNER JOIN will filter out any T1 which aren't JOINed which I don't want. to be continued... Looking forward to it. –  user1032531 Nov 29 '13 at 15:50
    
@user1032531 indeed with your new sqlfiddle www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/bd56e6/191. it isnt duplicated anymore..the new sqlfiddle shows the columns you need? –  Raymond Nijland Nov 29 '13 at 18:59
    
Yes, I suppose I get the results I need, and should keep to one of my original queries. Didn't know, however, if there was something better. Maybe in the WHERE clause, some sort of conditional IF statement that doesn't filter T1 if there wasn't a JOIN? –  user1032531 Nov 29 '13 at 21:38
    
An IF statement in the WHERE clause will make the index useless on that column –  Raymond Nijland Nov 29 '13 at 22:04

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