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I have 6 variables where there are unknows numbers in each. So as the numbers there are so big, I want to find the major one and next divide it for itself and for the others just to have numbers like 1 or less.

Example:

a1=85550 
b1=-18996 
c1=45500 
d1=-60000 
e1=74666 
f1=-35666

In this case a1 is the major so I must divide it for it self to have 1 and for the rest to have a 0 decimal one..

I have tried this but some values are 0 so its wrong.

if abs(a1>b1) and abs(a1>c1) and abs(a1>d1) and abs(a1>e1) and abs(a1>f1):
    a11=a1/a1
    b11=b1/a1
    c11=c1/a1
    d11=d1/a1
    e11=e1/a1
    f11=f1/a1
else:
    if abs(b1>a1) and abs(b1>c1) and abs(b1>d1) and abs(b1>e1) and abs(b1>f1):
        a11=a1/b1
        b11=b1/b1
        c11=c1/b1
        d11=d1/b1
        e11=e1/b1
        f11=f1/b1
    else:
        if abs(c1>a1) and abs(c1>b1) and abs(c1>d1) and abs(c1>e1) and abs(c1>f1):
            a11=a1/c1
            b11=b1/c1
            c11=c1/c1
            d11=d1/c1
            e11=e1/c1
            f11=f1/c1
        else:
            if abs(d1>a1) and abs(d1>c1) and abs(d1>b1) and abs(d1>e1) and abs(d1>f1):
                a11=a1/d1
                b11=b1/d1
                c11=c1/d1
                d11=d1/d1
                e11=e1/d1
                f11=f1/d1
            else:
                if abs(e1>a1) and abs(e1>c1) and abs(e1>d1) and abs(e1>b1) and abs(e1>f1):
                    a11=a1/e1
                    b11=b1/e1
                    c11=c1/e1
                    d11=d1/e1
                    e11=e1/e1
                    f11=f1/e1
                else:
                    if abs(f1>a1) and abs(f1>c1) and abs(f1>d1) and abs(f1>e1) and abs(f1>b1):
                        a11=a1/f1
                        b11=b1/f1
                        c11=c1/f1
                        d11=d1/f1
                        e11=e1/f1
                        f11=f1/f1
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2  
Why not put these values in a list then? Have you tried anything yourself yet? –  Martijn Pieters Nov 28 '13 at 21:02
    
See the update!! –  user3047319 Nov 28 '13 at 21:07
    
Hang on. Are you dividing everything by the known largest number? –  Makoto Nov 28 '13 at 21:08
    
yes! exactly but i have some troubles haha –  user3047319 Nov 28 '13 at 21:12
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Keep your values in a list:

values = [a1, b1, c1, d1, e1, f1]

Now the task is a simple one:

max_value = max(values, key=abs)
values = [v/max_value for v in values]

For your input, that'd give:

>>> a1=85550 
>>> b1=-18996 
>>> c1=45500 
>>> d1=-60000 
>>> e1=74666 
>>> f1=-35666
>>> values = [a1, b1, c1, d1, e1, f1]
>>> max_value = max(values, key=abs)
>>> [v/max_value for v in values]
[1.0, -0.22204558737580363, 0.5318527177089422, -0.701344243132671, 0.8727761542957335, -0.4169023962594974]

This assumes you are using Python 3; in Python 2, the / operator on integers gives integer output, so you want to use:

max_value = float(max(values, key=abs))

just to make one of the operands a floating point number. Otherwise you'll end up with [1, -1, 0, -1, 0, -1] instead.

The rest of your code can just use the numbers in values with indexing:

>>> values[0]
1.0

or you can assign the values back to the original names with sequence assignment:

>>> a1, b1, c1, d1, e1, f1 = values
>>> b1
-0.22204558737580363

but generally you want to keep your data out of your variable names.

share|improve this answer
    
I dontknow how to set the new values into my old variables, like: b1 now is -0.222 –  user3047319 Nov 29 '13 at 13:46
    
@user3047319: I show you how at the end of my answer. I'd use values[1] instead of b1 in the rest of your code, however. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 29 '13 at 13:47
    
Yea but whem I do a1, b1, c1, d1, e1, f1 = values after [v/max_value for v in values] and then print b1, it gives me the old value of the variable. –  user3047319 Nov 29 '13 at 14:10
    
You do need to assign the output of the list comprehension first. :-) values = [v / max_value for v in values]. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 29 '13 at 14:10
    
or you can combine the two: a1, b1, c1, d1, e1, f1 = [v / max_value for v in values]. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 29 '13 at 14:11
show 4 more comments

to divide two numbers, x and y, use the / operator:

z = x / y
share|improve this answer
    
in python 2 you probably want x / float(y) or similar –  andrew cooke Nov 28 '13 at 21:04
    
@andrewcooke The question sounds like integer arithmetic is required. –  XORcist Nov 28 '13 at 21:05
    
"1 or less" being 1 or zero?!?! nope. –  andrew cooke Nov 28 '13 at 21:06
    
i want to have the number 1 as the higher and then decimal numbers starting with 0 like 0,21552 –  user3047319 Nov 28 '13 at 21:08
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the / in python gives you an integer (whole number) if you are dividing integers. if the answer isn't exact it rounds down. so 1/2 is 0, not 0.5.

instead of

a / b

try converting one to a float:

a / float(b)

then you will get, say, 0.5 where you expect it.

you can also write a number as a float directly. 1.0/2 will give 0.5, for example, because 1.0 is a float, not an integer.

(also, what everyone else is saying about using lists)

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Place your values into a list.

l = [85550, -18996, 45500, -60000, 74666, -35666]

Sort the list in reverse order.

l.sort(reverse = True)

Then, map a function that divides each value by l[0], or the largest known value.

result = map(lambda x: x / l[0], l)

The answer will be every value in the list divided as integers by the max value, including the max value.

[1, 0, 0, -1, -1, -1]

If integer division is undesirable, cast x to a float.

result = map(lambda x: x / l[0], l)

[1.0, 0.8727761542957335, 0.5318527177089422, -0.22204558737580363, -0.4169023962594974, -0.701344243132671]

Alternative: Instead of sorting the list, only write the mapping function to go across x / max(l).

result = map(lambda x: x / max(l), l)
share|improve this answer
    
Why sort the list when max() will tell you the largest number for you? Note that the the OP is finding the largest absolute number. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 28 '13 at 21:50
    
And what if order was important? You now sorted the values, so the OP is not going to be able to sort out what number was b1 from e1. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 28 '13 at 21:50
    
Another nitpick: your alternative not only does not find the absolute maximum value, it also needlessly recalculates the maximum for every element in l. At the very least move that out. The line where you say the OP should cast x to a float doesn't actually do so, you show the exact same code that produced the integer results. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 29 '13 at 9:59
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