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I have made an implimentation of a spigot algorithm in C, however, it segfaults (SIGSEGV) when the number of decimals to calculate is too high. The number of digits the error occurs at is slightly different on a few different windows computers I have, but it happens around 156210. I would give only the relevant code, but I honestly don't really understand the error, so I will give you my full code.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <time.h>

int held[20]; //I wont have 19 consecutive 9's in pi, right?
int held_length = sizeof(held)/sizeof(int);

FILE *f;

void releaseDigits() {
    int c;
    for(c = held_length-1; c >= 0; c--) {
        if(held[c] != -1) {
           //printf("release: %i\n", held[c]); //debugging output
           fprintf(f, "%i", held[c]);
        }
    }
}

void incHeld() {
    int c;
    for(c = held_length-1; c >= 0; c--) {
        if(held[c] != -1) {
           held[c]++;
        }
    }
}

void blankHeld() {
    int c;
    for(c = held_length-1; c >= 0; c--) {
        held[c] = -1;
    }
    /*for(c = 0; c < held_length; c++) {
        printf("BLANK_%i:%i\n", c, held[c]);
    }*/ //debugging output
}

void deleteLast() {
    int c = held_length-1;
    while(held[c] != -1) {
        c--;
    }
    held[c+1] = -1;
}

void holdDigit(int hold) {
    int c = held_length-1;
    while(held[c] != -1) {
        c--;
    }
    held[c] = hold;
    for(c = 0; c < held_length; c++) {
        //printf("held_%i:%i\n", c, held[c]); //debugging output
    }
}

void main() {
    time_t start, end;
    int n; //decimals of pi, 156207 max if printf, 156210 if fprintf, higher = sivsegv
    printf("Decimal places of pi to calculate (max 156210 for now): ");
    scanf("%i", &n);
    start = clock();
    f = fopen("pi.txt", "w"); //open file
    if (f == NULL) {
        printf("Error opening file!\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    n++; //overcompensate for odd ending digit error
    //initial array of 2,2,2,...2
    int rem[((10*n)/3)+2]; //sizeof(one)/sizeof(int);
    int init_count;
    for(init_count = 0; init_count < ((10*n)/3)+2; init_count++) {
        rem[init_count] = 2;
    }
    //main digit loop
    int carry;
    int decimal;
    int pi_digit;
    for(decimal = 0; decimal <= n; decimal++) {
        carry = 0;
        int sum;
        int i;
        for(i = (10*n)/3 + 1; i >= 1; i--) {
            sum = (rem[i]*10)+carry;
            rem[i] = sum % ((2*i)+1);
            carry = ((sum-rem[i])/((2*i)+1))* i;
            //printf("decimal:%i i:%i B:%i carry:%i sum:%i rem:%i\n", decimal, i, (2*i)+1, carry, sum, rem[i]); //debugging output
        }
        sum = (rem[0]*10)+carry;
        rem[0] = sum % 10;
        pi_digit = (sum - rem[0])/10;
        //printf("sum:%i rem:%i\n",sum, rem[i]); //debugging output
        if(pi_digit != 10) {
            if(pi_digit != 9) {
                if(decimal > 0) {
                    releaseDigits();
                }
                if(decimal == 1) {
                    fprintf(f, "."); //shove a point up in that shit
                }
                blankHeld();
                holdDigit(pi_digit);
            }
            else {
                holdDigit(pi_digit);
            }
        }
        else {
           incHeld();
           releaseDigits();
           blankHeld();
           holdDigit(0);
        }
        printf("\r%i/%i decimal places done...                  ", decimal-1, n-1);
    }
    deleteLast(); //hide overcompensation
    releaseDigits();
    fclose(f);
    end = clock();
    int raw_seconds = (end - start)/1000.;
    int seconds = raw_seconds % 60;
    int minutes = (raw_seconds - seconds)/60;
    printf("\n\nSuccessfully calculated %i decimal places of pi in %i minutes and %i seconds!\nSaved to pi.txt\nPress ENTER to exit the program.\n", n-1, minutes, seconds);
    while(getch()!=0x0d);
}

Could someone please explain what is happening here?

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closed as off-topic by Oli Charlesworth, Mitch Wheat, Shafik Yaghmour, rae1, Bathsheba Mar 4 at 21:10

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "This question appears to be off-topic because it lacks sufficient information to diagnose the problem. Describe your problem in more detail or include a minimal example in the question itself." – rae1, Bathsheba
  • "Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself. See SSCCE.org for guidance." – Oli Charlesworth, Mitch Wheat, Shafik Yaghmour
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Hi. Asking people to spot errors in your code is not especially productive. You should use the debugger (or add print statements) to isolate the problem, by tracing the progress of your program, and comparing it to what you expect to happen. As soon as the two diverge, then you've found your problem. (And then if necessary, you should construct a minimal test-case.) And in this particular scenario, the debugger will tell you exactly which line is causing the seg-fault. –  Oli Charlesworth Nov 28 '13 at 23:47
    
That's just the problem, there is no line causing the segfault. It says: Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault. In ?? () () A window called "Call Stack" pops up each time with a different function causing the error, sometimes ntdll!RtlpNtSetValueKey(), sometimes KERNEL32!GetPrivateProfileStructA(), etc. Again, the code runs fine for lower values. I don't understand segfaults all too well, so I don't know how to deal with this. –  Nimaid Nov 29 '13 at 0:46
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1 Answer 1

I used Valgrind, the famous memory checking tool, on your code. Relatively small values (i.e., 10, 100, 1000, even 10000) were no problem. Attempting 156210 instantly made Valgrind complain. It looks like the problem starts with this line:

int rem[((10*n)/3)+2];

The problem is that allocating storage in this manner asks for memory from the stack and this computed value ((10 * 156210 / 3 + 2) = 520702, sizeof(int) = 4 on Windows, so 520702 * 4 = about 2MB) is far more than the machine is prepared to give you from the stack.

If you need this much memory, better to allocate it from the heap using malloc() (don't forget to free() it afterwards).

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