Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

If the value of hashmap is a Boolean then is it worth using a Hashset ? My question would be confusing but its not easy to frame up right words to ask either. The code below explains my problem. The code solves the following question Given some cubes, can cubes be arranged such that an input word can be formed from top view of cubes? eg: assume an imaginary cube with only 3 surfaces where cube1: {a, b, c} and cube2 {m, n, o}, then word an can be formed but word ap cannot be formed. I have two approaches for this question, use a HashMap<String, boolean> or use a Hashset. Advantage of Hashmap is that it does not cause a lot of rehashing. advantage of hashset is code looks (atleast to me) as smaller and cleaner. What is the right solution / industry wide followed practice in such cases"

OPTION 1: char[][] m is the set of cubes where rows are cubes and columns are surfaces

public static boolean checkWord(char[][] m, String word) {
        final Map<Character, Boolean> charAvailable = new HashMap<Character, Boolean>();
        char[] chWords = word.toCharArray();

        for (char ch : chWords) {
            charAvailable.put(ch, true);
        }

        return findWordExists(m, charAvailable, 0);
    }

    private static boolean findWordExists (char[][] m, Map<Character, Boolean> charAvailable, int cubeNumber) {

        if (cubeNumber == m.length) {
            Collection<Boolean> booleanValues = charAvailable.values();
            for (boolean available : booleanValues) {
                if (available) return false;
            }
            return true;
        }

        for (int i = 0; i <  m[cubeNumber].length; i++) {
            if (charAvailable.get(m[cubeNumber][i]) == Boolean.TRUE) {
                charAvailable.put(m[cubeNumber][i], false);
                if (findWordExists(m, charAvailable, cubeNumber + 1)) {
                    return true;
                }
                charAvailable.put(m[cubeNumber][i], true);
            }

        }
        return false;
    }

OPTION 2: char[][] m is the set of cubes where rows are cubes and columns are surfaces

public static boolean checkWord(char[][] m, String word) {
        final Set<Character> charAvailable = new HashSet<Character>();
        char[] chWords = word.toCharArray();

        for (char ch : chWords) {

            System.out.println(" adding: " + ch);
            charAvailable.add(ch);
        }
        return findWordExists(m, charAvailable, 0);
    }

    private static boolean findWordExists (char[][] m, Set<Character> charAvailable, int cubeNumber) {
        if (cubeNumber == m.length) {
            return charAvailable.isEmpty();
        }

        for (int i = 0; i <  m[cubeNumber].length; i++) {
            if (charAvailable.contains(m[cubeNumber][i])) {
                charAvailable.remove(m[cubeNumber][i]);
                if (findWordExists(m, charAvailable, cubeNumber + 1)) {
                    return true;
                }
                charAvailable.add(m[cubeNumber][i]);
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The HashSet will be more memory-efficient and time-efficient, but leaves some ambiguity depending on the application.

Consider the scenario where a program processes many custom objects of some type User, and records their answer to a "yes or no" question. There are 3 possible states a User could be in during this processing:

  1. User says "yes"
  2. User says "no"
  3. User has not been processed yet

Using a HashSet alone (i.e. without an additional data structure), depending on the situation it may be ambiguous as to whether or not a User not found in the HashSet has replied "no", or simply not been processed yet. A HashMap, although being less efficient because it must store multiple Boolean instances, would allow you to differentiate between the 3 cases listed above.

Note that in practicality, there are many cases where the 3rd case can be eliminated (e.g. by iterating through every User instance so you can assume each processed User is only encountered once), and the HashSet would be the appropriate choice.

share|improve this answer
1  
A HashSet will be no more efficient than a HashMap - docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/HashSet.html "This class implements the Set interface, backed by a hash table (actually a HashMap instance)." – user289086 Nov 29 '13 at 17:26
    
@MichaelT: That is interesting, I didn't know that. Do you know what HashSet maps to for values? I'm guessing that it maps to null instances. – SimonT Nov 29 '13 at 21:06
1  
The add method stores an Object that is a final static for the class (named PRESENT). – user289086 Nov 29 '13 at 21:22

The solution that uses Set will probably be more readable, and easier to maintain - for example you avoid a whole class of problems when you modify your code like "what happens if I put a false value in the map - will it break my code?".

As a side note, Java's HashSet is quite inefficient memory-wise and actually uses a HashMap under the covers. Still, in most cases it is code readability and maintainability that matters most and not implementation details like this.

share|improve this answer
    
I tend to agree. – JavaDeveloper Nov 29 '13 at 0:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.