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I was following one of the exercises in the book "The C Programming Language": http://users.powernet.co.uk/eton/kandr2/krx116.html

In the below program, if the input file contains the line 'h\n', for example, the getline function initializes i and j to 0. Since 'h' is not EOF or '\n', the block in loop executes, the c is assigned to the 0 index of the s array pointer, since j is 0. Then j increments to 1. Then the block ends and the i counter increments to 1. And the loop checks if the next character is a '\n', and it is, so the block exits. At this point, i and j are both equal to 1. Since c is equal to '\n', c is inserted into index 1 of the s pointer, since j is 1. Then j is incremented to 2. Then i is incremented to 2. Then the null terminator '\0' is inserted into index 2 of the s pointer, since j is 2. Then the function returns 2, since i is also 2.

I see no point of the j variable. Because when it increments, so does i. Someone said I was wrong:

"because they're incremented at different rates. The i counter is used to keep track of the length of the string. The j variable, at the end of the processing, stores the point where the null terminator needs to go in the string."

But I say since i and j are the same values (one is just incremented after the other), you could use i to the point where the null terminator needs to go, since i would also be equal to 2 in my above example.

#include <stdio.h>

#define MAXLINE 1000 /* maximum input line size */

int getline(char line[], int maxline);
void copy(char to[], char from[]);

/* print longest input line */
int main(void)
{
  int len;               /* current line length */
  int max;               /* maximum length seen so far */
  char line[MAXLINE];    /* current input line */
  char longest[MAXLINE]; /* longest line saved here */

  max = 0;

  while((len = getline(line, MAXLINE)) > 0)
  {
    printf("%d: %s", len, line);

    if(len > max)
    {
      max = len;
      copy(longest, line);
    }
  }
  if(max > 0)
  {
    printf("Longest is %d characters:\n%s", max, longest);
  }
  printf("\n");
  return 0;
}

/* getline: read a line into s, return length */
int getline(char s[], int lim)
{
  int c, i, j;

  for(i = 0, j = 0; (c = getchar())!=EOF && c != '\n'; ++i)
  {
    if(i < lim - 1)
    {
      s[j++] = c;
    }
  }
  if(c == '\n')
  {
    if(i <= lim - 1)
    {
      s[j++] = c;
    }
    ++i;
  }
  s[j] = '\0';
  return i;
}

/* copy: copy 'from' into 'to'; assume 'to' is big enough */
void copy(char to[], char from[])
{
  int i;

  i = 0;
  while((to[i] = from[i]) != '\0')
  {
    ++i;
  }
}

Am I right or wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Think about what happens when you try to read a really long line. You're just using the wrong test case to understand it fully. –  Mark Ransom Nov 29 '13 at 1:21
    
Yeah, I dont have a compiler handy, but it looks like i == j up to a point, but they do diverge. –  Fiddling Bits Nov 29 '13 at 1:25
    
wouldn't the line s[j] = '\0' cause a buffer overflow if the length of the line is the same as MAXLINE? –  Jason L Nov 29 '13 at 2:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're not quite right. If the input string is longer than the limit, the loop will continue incrementing i in order to count input characters even though they're not going into the result string.

share|improve this answer
    
I forgot to consider that use case lol –  JohnMerlino Nov 29 '13 at 1:35
    
This is a perfect example of why good variable names are important. If i were instead nRead and j were instead nStored, it would be obvious. –  Gene Nov 30 '13 at 1:04

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