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I'm trying to convert a default dict filled with a large amount of data into a pandas dataframe. When the # of values in the dictionary is small (say, ten), I get something like:

       Obama Romney      dates
    0   47.5   41.5  2/01/2011
    1   47.5   41.5  2/02/2011
    2   47.5   41.5  2/03/2011
    3   47.5   41.5  2/04/2011
    4   47.5   41.5  2/05/2011
    5   47.5   41.5  2/06/2011
    6   46.4   42.0  2/07/2011
    7   46.4   42.0  2/08/2011
    8   46.7   42.7  2/09/2011
    9   46.7   42.7  2/10/2011
    10  47.3   42.0  2/11/2011

when I try to print the dataframe -- this is what I want. But when the items is 100 or more, I just get a summary:

    <class 'pandas.core.frame.DataFrame'>
    Int64Index: 652 entries, 0 to 651
    Data columns (total 3 columns):
    Obama     652  non-null values
    Romney    652  non-null values
    dates     652  non-null values
    dtypes: object(3)

Is there any way to print the values as was done previously for 10 items?

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Can't you just loop through the rows? –  aIKid Nov 29 '13 at 2:25

2 Answers 2

Check out the set_option function:

import pandas as pd

pd.set_option('max_rows', 150)
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FYI the repr is being changed in 0.13! –  Andy Hayden Nov 29 '13 at 4:36

You want head, which looks at the first n rows (by default n=5):

In [11]: df.head()  # equivalent to df.head(5)
Out[11]: 
   Obama  Romney      dates
0   47.5    41.5  2/01/2011
1   47.5    41.5  2/02/2011
2   47.5    41.5  2/03/2011
3   47.5    41.5  2/04/2011
4   47.5    41.5  2/05/2011

or its opposite, tail, for the last n rows.

Note that it's agreed this is confusing: it's changing in 0.13. Here's the current behaviour in master/dev:

In [21]: pd.concat([df] * 100)  # 100 copies of df
Out[21]: 
    Obama  Romney      dates
0    47.5    41.5  2/01/2011
1    47.5    41.5  2/02/2011
2    47.5    41.5  2/03/2011
# ommiting a load of lines here
# which make it up to 100 (pd.options.display.max_rows)
3    47.5    41.5  2/04/2011
4    47.5    41.5  2/05/2011
      ...     ...        ...

[1100 rows x 3 columns]
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