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Is there a command in Microsoft SQL Server T-SQL to tell the script to stop processing? I have a script that I want to keep for archival purposes, but I don't want anyone to run it.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 16 down vote accepted

An alternate solution could be to alter the flow of execution of your script by using the GOTO statement...

DECLARE  @RunScript bit;
SET @RunScript = 0;

IF @RunScript != 1
BEGIN
RAISERROR ('Raise Error does not stop processing, so we will call GOTO to skip over the script', 1, 1);
GOTO Skipper -- This will skip over the script and go to Skipper
END

PRINT 'This is where your working script can go';
PRINT 'This is where your working script can go';
PRINT 'This is where your working script can go';
PRINT 'This is where your working script can go';

Skipper: -- Don't do nuttin!

Warning! The above sample was derived from an example I got from Merrill Aldrich. Before you implement the GOTO statement blindly, I recommend you read his tutorial on Flow control in T-SQL Scripts.

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1  
Thank you Jed! I like his :ON Error EXIT example. –  Phillip Apr 4 '12 at 18:45
3  
@Pedro: This will fail if you add GO between the working script sections because GOT applies per batch. You must have GO to break the script into batches when you have CREATE statements etc that often must be the first command in a batch. See chadhoc's comments on other answers –  gbn Apr 5 '12 at 6:51
1  
Jed. Thanks for the link to "Flow control" what an eye-opener: I've spent the last hour playing with every configuration I can think of and crying at the thought of how many scripts I might need to correct. :-( –  Kevin Roche Nov 29 '13 at 12:19
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No, there isn't one - you have a couple of options:

  1. Wrap the whole script in a big if/end block that is simply ensured to not be true (i.e. "if 1=2 begin" - this will only work however if the script doesn't include any GO statements (as those indicate a new batch)

  2. Use the return statement at the top (again, limited by the batch separators)

  3. Use a connection based approach, which will ensure non-execution for the entire script (entire connection to be more accurate) - use something like a 'SET PARSEONLY ON' or 'SET NOEXEC ON' at the top of the script. This will ensure all statements in the connection (or until said set statement is turned off) will not execute and will instead be parsed/compiled only.

  4. Use a comment block to comment out the entire script (i.e. /* and */)

EDIT: Demonstration that the 'return' statement is batch specific - note that you will continue to see result-sets after the returns:

select 1
return
go
select 2
return
select 3
go
select 4
return
select 5
select 6
go
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Why not simply add the following to the beginning of the script

PRINT 'INACTIVE SCRIPT'
RETURN
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7  
Note that this will not work if the script contains batch separators (i.e. GO statements) - the return will only return from the first batch. –  chadhoc Jan 8 '10 at 14:17
1  
OH! That's good to know! Maybe I should put a /* at the beginning and a */ at the end! –  Phillip Jan 8 '10 at 14:19
    
Good point chadHoc, I thought he was referring to a stored procedure... Thanks –  Sparky Jan 8 '10 at 14:24
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To work around the RETURN/GO issue you could put RAISERROR ('Oi! Stop!', 20, 1) WITH LOG at the top.

This will close the client connection as per RAISERROR on MSDN.

The very big downside is you have to be sysadmin to use severity 20.

Edit:

A simple demonstration to counter Jersey Dude's comment...

RAISERROR ('Oi! Stop!', 20, 1)  WITH LOG
SELECT 'Will not run'
GO
SELECT 'Will not run'
GO
SELECT 'Will not run'
GO
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Again, this will only work in the current batch. Execution begins again at the beginning of the next batch (After the GO). –  Jersey Dude Feb 26 '11 at 0:00
    
@Jersey Dude: You are wrong. The client connection is closed with severity 20 and above. So no more batches will run. Or can you prove otherwise? –  gbn Feb 26 '11 at 7:54
    
@neves: really? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa238452(v=sql.80).aspx –  gbn Jan 28 '12 at 7:06
1  
@gbn: no, I was wrong. It is Try/Cacth that was introduced in 2005. Sorry. –  neves Jan 29 '12 at 20:00
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GBN is Correct:

RAISERROR ('Message', 20, 1)

will work.

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Thanks user622055. I've changed the accepted answer. –  Phillip Feb 28 '11 at 17:21
    
Note: Error severity levels greater than 18 can only be specified by members of the sysadmin role, using the WITH LOG option. –  Thor Hovden Feb 7 at 12:36
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RAISERROR with severity 20 will report as error in Event Viewer.

You can use SET PARSEONLY ON; (or NOEXEC). At the end of script use GO SET PARSEONLY OFF;

SET PARSEONLY ON;
-- statement between here will not run

SELECT 'THIS WILL NOT EXEC';

GO
-- statement below here will run

SET PARSEONLY OFF;
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Try running this as a TSQL Script

SELECT 1
RETURN
SELECT 2
SELECT 3

The return ends the execution.

RETURN (Transact-SQL)

Exits unconditionally from a query or procedure. RETURN is immediate and complete and can be used at any point to exit from a procedure, batch, or statement block. Statements that follow RETURN are not executed.

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Again, wouldn't help for a script that contains batch separators (i.e. GO statements) - return is batch specific. –  chadhoc Jan 8 '10 at 14:21
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Despite its very explicit and forceful description, RETURN did not work for me inside a stored procedure (to skip further execution). I had to modify the condition logic. Happens on both SQL 2008, 2008 R2:

create proc dbo.prSess_Ins
(
    @sSessID    varchar( 32 )
,   @idSess     int out
)
as
begin
    set nocount on

    select  @id=    idSess
        from    tbSess
        where   sSessID = @sSessID

    if  @idSess > 0 return  -- exit sproc here

    begin   tran
        insert  tbSess  ( sSessID ) values  ( @sSessID )
        select  @idSess=    scope_identity( )
    commit
end

had to be changed into:

    if  @idSess is null
    begin
        begin   tran
            insert  tbSess  ( sSessID ) values  ( @sSessID )
            select  @idSess=    scope_identity( )
        commit
    end

Discovered as a result of finding duplicated rows. Debugging PRINTs confirmed that @idSess had value greater than zero in the IF check - RETURN did not break execution!

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1  
Later found that if i specify a return value (as in return 1), RETURN works as expected - exiting the sproc. –  Astrogator Dec 13 '11 at 16:20
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