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Probably a really simple one this - I'm starting out with C# and need to add values to an array, for example:

int[] terms;

for(int runs = 0; runs < 400; runs++)
{
    terms[] = value;
}

For those who have used PHP, here's what I'm trying to do in C#:

$arr = array();
for ($i = 0; $i < 10; $i++) {
    $arr[] = $i;
}
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1  
Shouldn't 'terms[] = value;' be 'terms[] = runs;'? –  Tymek Feb 7 '13 at 1:28
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11 Answers

up vote 226 down vote accepted

You can either

int[] terms = new int[400];
for (int runs = 0; runs < 400; runs++)
{
    terms[runs] = value;
}

or, you can use Lists

List<int> list = new List<int>();
for (int runs = 0; runs < 400; runs++)
{
    list.Add(value);
}

// You can convert it back to an array if you would like to
int[] terms = list.ToArray();
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3  
+1 for showing both list and array options. –  Registered User Jul 23 '12 at 19:05
    
Thanks, I did not know about lists. –  Maarten00 Apr 3 '13 at 19:27
    
Whats the advantage of using a list in this scenario? –  Phill Healey Feb 17 at 11:10
    
@PhillHealey You don't have to "know" how big the array might become, before you create it. As you can see, in these examples, OP has to put a value into "new int[400]" - but with the list, he doesn't have to do so. –  Hejner Mar 5 at 13:09
    
@Hejner Ah! Ok, thanks for the clarification. –  Phill Healey Mar 6 at 12:45
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If you're writing in C# 3, you can do it with a one-liner:

int[] terms = Enumerable.Range(0, 400).ToArray();

This code snippet assumes that you have a using directive for System.Linq at the top of your file.

On the other hand, if you're looking for something that can be dynamically resized, as it appears is the case for PHP (I've never actually learned it), then you may want to use a List instead of an int[]. Here's what that code would look like:

List<int> terms = Enumerable.Range(0, 400).ToList();

Note, however, that you cannot simply add a 401st element by setting terms[400] to a value. You'd instead need to call Add(), like this:

terms.Add(1337);
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Answers on how to do it using an array are provided here.

However, C# has a very handy thing called System.Collections :)

Collections are fancy alternatives to using an array, though many of them use an array internally.

For example, C# has a collection called List that functions very similar to the PHP array.

using System.Collections.Generic;

// Create a List, and it can only contain integers.
List<int> list = new List<int>();

for (int i = 0; i < 400; i++)
{
   list.Add(i);
}
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2  
+1 for adding the using syntax –  Cawas Jan 19 '12 at 14:01
    
for retrieving a list element: int a = list[i]; –  Behzad Mar 16 '13 at 9:45
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You have to allocate the array first:

int [] terms = new int[400]; // allocate an array of 400 ints
for(int runs = 0; runs < terms.Length; runs++) // Use Length property rather than the 400 magic number again
{
    terms[runs] = value;
}
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int ArraySize = 400;

int[] terms = new int[ArraySize];


for(int runs = 0; runs < ArraySize; runs++)
{

    terms[runs] = runs;

}

That would be how I'd code it.

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C# arrays are fixed length and always indexed. Go with Motti's solution:

int [] terms = new int[400];
for(int runs = 0; runs < 400; runs++)
{
    terms[runs] = value;
}

Note that this array is a dense array, a contiguous block of 400 bytes where you can drop things. If you want a dynamically sized array, use a List<int>.

List<int> terms = new List<int>();
for(int runs = 0; runs < 400; runs ++)
{
    terms.Add(runs);
}

Neither int[] nor List<int> is an associative array -- that would be a Dictionary<> in C#. Both arrays and lists are dense.

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int[] terms = new int[10]; //create 10 empty index in array terms

//fill value = 400 for every index (run) in the array
//terms.Length is the total length of the array, it is equal to 10 in this case 
for (int run = 0; run < terms.Length; run++) 
{
    terms[run] = 400;
}

//print value from each of the index
for (int run = 0; run < terms.Length; run++)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Value in index {0}:\t{1}",run, terms[run]);
}

Console.ReadLine();

/*Output:

Value in index 0: 400
Value in index 1: 400
Value in index 2: 400
Value in index 3: 400
Value in index 4: 400
Value in index 5: 400
Value in index 6: 400
Value in index 7: 400
Value in index 8: 400
Value in index 9: 400
*/

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Could you explain this solution? –  Rune Jan 31 '13 at 8:15
    
Rune, I have just included the comment inside the source code> Hope it could answer your question. –  jhyap Jan 31 '13 at 23:58
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You can't just add an element to an array easily. You can set the element at a given position as fallen888 outlined, but I recommend to use a List<int> or a Collection<int> instead, and use ToArray() if you need it converted into an array.

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int[] terms = new int[400];

for(int runs = 0; runs < 400; runs++)
{
    terms[runs] = value;
}
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add comment
         static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int[] arrayname = new int[5];/*arrayname is an array of 5 integer [5] mean in array [0],[1],[2],[3],[4],[5] because array starts with zero*/
            int i, j;


          /*initialize elements of array arrayname*/
            for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
            {
                arrayname[i] = i + 100;
            }

             /*output each array element value*/
            for (j = 0; j < 5; j++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Element and output value [{0}]={1}",j,arrayname[j]);
            }
            Console.ReadKey();/*Obtains the next character or function key pressed by the user.
                                The pressed key is displayed in the console window.*/
        }
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            /*arrayname is an array of 5 integer*/
            int[] arrayname = new int[5];
            int i, j;
            /*initialize elements of array arrayname*/
            for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
            {
                arrayname[i] = i + 100;
            }
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