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So I have a list of 0's and 1's, I want to find the count of each element and output this to a list. I can think of a recursive way to do it with functions but is there any helper functions which can help to convert this?

I believe groupBy could be useful but it seems to group all the elements into one partition or another, not into the way I want.

I want to have a list of the count of numbers until each transition from 0 to 1 and 1 to 0. ie, if we have 0,0,0, .. ok we counted 3 zeros so remember 3, then we have 1,1,1,1 so we counted 4 1's, so we remember 4, so far we have a list of [3,4...] and so on

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Ruby has the very useful Enumerable#chunk for this: [0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1].chunk {|e| e }.map(&:last).map(&:size) # => [3, 4, 2, 2]. Could be a useful addition to Scala's standard library. – Jörg W Mittag Nov 29 '13 at 9:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This might be a little complicated. but I'd go with it.

scala> implicit class ListHelper[A](ls:List[A]) {
         def partitionBy(f: (A, A) => Boolean) = if (ls.isEmpty) List.empty[Int] 
           else (ls zip (ls.head :: ls)).foldLeft(List.empty[Int]){
             case (Nil, _) => List(1)
             case (x :: xs, (a, b)) => if (a == b) (x + 1) :: xs else 1 :: x :: xs
         }.reverse
       }
defined class ListHelper

scala> List(0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1).partitionBy(_ == _)
res27: List[Int] = List(3, 4, 2, 2)

This is based on the clojure function partition-by

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Complicated implementation but simple usage. – Phil Nov 29 '13 at 10:43
    
I selected this as the answer as its the one I used, I used it because it's re-usable for other cases. – Phil Dec 5 '13 at 4:01

tail-rec version of Yann Moisan's solution:

    def pack[A](ls: Seq[A], prev: Seq[Int] = Seq.empty): Seq[Int] = {
        if (ls.isEmpty) prev
        else {
            val (packed, next) = ls span {_ == ls.head }
            pack(next, prev :+ packed.size)
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
def pack[A](ls: List[A]): List[Int] = {
  if (ls.isEmpty) List(0)
  else {
    val (packed, next) = ls span { _ == ls.head }
    if (next == Nil) List(packed.size)
    else packed.size :: pack(next)
  }
}
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1  
that this can be implemented as tail-recursive function – Sergey Passichenko Nov 29 '13 at 9:11
    
This is a useful function, is it included in any Scala library? – Phil Nov 29 '13 at 9:22
    
Sergey want to show the recursive solution? I'm curious... – Phil Nov 29 '13 at 9:24
    
pack is not included in the standard library, but it is based on the standard method span. – Yann Moisan Nov 29 '13 at 9:31

This is groupBy.

 val tuple = list.foldRight((0,0)) { (x, accum) =>
     if (x == 0) (accum._1 +1, accum._2) else (accum._1, accum._2 +1) 
 }
 List(tuple._1, tuple._2)

on similar lines here is fliptracker (for non-empty lists):

def fliptracker(list: List[Int]) = {

    val initial = (list.head, 0, List.empty[Int])

    val result = list.foldLeft(initial) {

        (acc, x) =>

          if (acc._1 == x) (acc._1, acc._2 + 1, acc._3) 
          else (x, 1, acc._3 ::: List(acc._2))
    }

    result._3 ::: List (result._2)
}       

fliptracker(List(0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1)) // List(3, 4, 2, 2)
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry this is the same as groupBy, I want to have a list of the count of numbers until each transition from 0 to 1 and 1 to 0. ie, if we have 0,0,0, .. ok we counted 3 zeros so remember 3, then we have 1,1,1,1 so we counted 4 1's, so we remember 4, so far we have a list of [3,4...] and so on – Phil Nov 29 '13 at 9:28
    
ok, please add this example to your question. it was not clear from the text. – Shyamendra Solanki Nov 29 '13 at 9:33
    
added fliptracker, on similar lines to earlier method. – Shyamendra Solanki Nov 29 '13 at 10:36

Another alternative answer based upon takeWhile. In this 1==black and 0==white

case class IndexCount(index: Int, count: Int, black: Boolean)

@tailrec
def takeWhileSwitch(black: Boolean, index:Int, list: List[Boolean], 
        result: List[IndexCount]): List[IndexCount] = {
  if (list == Nil) return result.reverse

  val takenWhile = list.takeWhile(black == _)
  val takenLength = takenWhile.length

  val resultToBuild = if (takenLength != 0) {
    val indexCount = IndexCount(index, takenLength, black)
    indexCount :: result
  } else result

  takeWhileSwitch(!black, index + takenLength, list.drop(takenLength), resultToBuild)
}
val items = takeWhileSwitch(true, 0, rowsWithBlack, List[IndexCount]())
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I would do

List(0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1).foldLeft (List.empty[(Any,Int)]) { 
    (acc,a) => acc match {
        case (`a`, occ) :: tail => (a,occ+1) :: tail
        case _                  => (a,1) :: acc
}}.reverse.map(_._2)

res1: List[Int] = List(3, 4, 2, 2)
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Nobody expects the imperative solution:

def chunk[A](xs: List[A]) = {
  val ys = collection.mutable.Buffer[Int]()
  var prev = xs.head
  var count = 1
  for (x <- xs.tail) {      
    if (x != prev) {
      ys += count
      prev = x
      count = 1
    }
    else count += 1 
  }
  ys += count
  ys.toList
}
share|improve this answer
    
Its the same style I used to program when I wrote C and C++ code, but now I try to be functional. For my mind, your solution is very clear and easy to read. – Phil Dec 5 '13 at 3:55

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