Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've always wondered what are the pros and the cons of these ID naming styles in SQL:

CREATE TABLE cache (
id INT AUTO_INCREMENT,
PRIMARY KEY(id)
);

CREATE TABLE cache (
cid INT AUTO_INCREMENT,
PRIMARY KEY(id)
);

CREATE TABLE cache (
cache_id INT AUTO_INCREMENT,
PRIMARY KEY(id)
);

Why some developers use "id" in each table, some prefix it with one letter of the table name or with the entire table name along with one underscore?

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's all a personal preference. I personally use Id simply because I think of each table as its own entity...then when I reference with a key it becomes CustomerId or OrderId depending on the name of the table.

share|improve this answer
    
I use the same approach as Justin, so the queries look like: Customer.ID or Order.ID –  Sparky Jan 8 '10 at 14:27
1  
Some people like to use natural joins, which won't work with this scheme. However, as natural joins are are the work of the Devil, any naming convention which makes it harder to use them is probably a good thing. –  APC Jan 8 '10 at 14:53
1  
IME, this convention falls apart when you have multiple id's (foreign keys for instance) cuz you don't know which the id represents. Data type won't help, so you have to look at the keys to know what is what –  OMG Ponies Jan 8 '10 at 15:54

Subjective, but I like to use named ids (e.g. customer_id, item_id, etc.)

My reasoning is that if you name your foreign keys consistently it makes joins easier to understand - it's always a.customer_id = b.customer_id. Otherwise, with complicated queries that use lots of joins, you have a sea of "id" columns and it's not immediately obvious what goes with what.

ETA:

Also, if you are using MySQL, you can use the simpler join syntax, e.g.:

FROM customers INNER JOIN orders USING customer_id
share|improve this answer
1  
Not really an issue if your tables aren't named "a" and "b"; Order.CustomerID = Customer.ID says the same thing and has less redundancy... –  Chris Shaffer Jan 8 '10 at 14:37
1  
@Chris - true, but when aliasing table names in a large query, things can get messy. It also serves as a sanity check to ensure that you aren't joining to the wrong table. –  Eric Petroelje Jan 8 '10 at 14:51
    
@EricPetroelje I've only had bad experiences with this, as developers tend to use really bad alias names like iis, isi whenever I see this convention in play just to avoid the redundancy this method creates. –  Anther Mar 15 '13 at 19:19

The pros of just using 'id' is that you have a uniform field, and it's easy to remember and type.

The pros of prefixing id with the table name is that it can be easier to work with when working with multiple tables frequently.

cid seems like the worst of three options, with none of the benefits of the other two.

share|improve this answer

Native SQL: its best to use something more specific than id so that the humans writing the sql don't always have to prefix with a table alias. By eliminating the need for aliases you can significantly shrink the size of the SQL and eliminate a lot of errors at the same time.

Prefixing, even with a table name, is no more characters than a more specific column name:

customer.id
customer_id

On different note, since the foreign key column references a table, why not just use the name of the table as the foreign key?

table order (
     id        SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
     customer  INTEGER NOT NULL REFERENCES (customer)
...

Then we have:

FROM customer INNER JOIN order ON customer.id = order.customer
share|improve this answer

Some ORMs work "better" when you name each table's primary key as "id".

share|improve this answer

The first decision is 'id' or not, and it is driven by tool that's handling the SQL:

  • ORM: some prefer 'id'
  • Native SQL: its best to use something more specific than id so that the humans writing the sql don't always have to prefix with a table alias. By eliminating the need for aliases you can significantly shrink the size of the SQL and eliminate a lot of errors at the same time.

The second decision, if you're using an ORM that demands 'id', is:

  • You can just go with ORM constraints on all column names
  • Or you can name the columns for humans, and create a separate view that renames the columns to what the ORM wants. This is a bit of work, but if you have more than just the ORM looking at the tables (reporting tools, other ORMs, etc) it may be worthwhile.

Or the second decision, if you're not using 'id', is - how to build names in a relational databases:

  • You typically don't have case to use - so camelcase, etc don't work
  • You want to avoid naming collisions
  • You want names to be a little intuitive without knowing the table name
  • You want names to be consistently formatted
  • So, cid isn't very good. cache_id is preferable.
share|improve this answer

As a few other have already pointed out: It's really a personal preference.

I more or less stick to the third approach (table foo will get the id column "foo_id") but cannot really tell you why ;-)

An advantage of the first approch ist that you can rename your table without having to rename your id column to reflect the change. But that's hardly a reason to make it a doctrine.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.