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I have encountered code that leverages jQuery, similar to the following.

NAMESPACE = {
    propertyA : $("#selector-a"),
    propertyB : $("#selector-b")
}

$(NAMESPACE.propertyA).click(function(){
    // ...
});

This seems to work, even though the syntax for attaching the click handler should be.

NAMESPACE.propertyA.click(function(){
    // ...
});

Does jQuery have the built in ability to resolve the following, despite the incorrect syntax?

$($("#my-selector")).click ... etc.
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, it will handle this if necessary. You really ought not use this syntax though if it's within your control. I tested against the following and got the same results with both:

$($("li")).click(function(e){
  alert(e.target);
});

//--

$("li").click(function(e){
  alert(e.target);
});
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Use of this syntax was not my decision, and I understand that it is not desirable. –  jerome Jan 8 '10 at 15:06
    
@jerome: No blood, no foul :) I understand having to work with other people's finicky code. –  Jonathan Sampson Jan 8 '10 at 15:08

Yes. jQuery allows as arguments to the $:

  • A CSS selector
  • A DOM element
  • An array of DOM elements
  • A jQuery object
  • A function (which will be called as part of $.ready())

All of these are valid syntax as far as jQuery is concerned, though performance may suffer in some of these cases.

Since your NAMESPACE.properties are jQuery elements, this will work.

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