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I want to check if the given file exists However, I do not know how to properly write the condition to point to other files

#!/bin/bash

if [ $# -ge 2 ]
then
    for i in `seq 1 $#`
    do
        if [ -e ${$i} ]
        then
            echo "yes"
        else
            echo "not exist"
        fi

    done


else
    echo ""
fi
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your condition should be:

if [ -e "$i" ]

not:

if [ -e ${$i} ]

I'm not clear about what you are asking. Are you passing filenames as arguments to the script? If so, you need to loop over the arguments like this:

for file in "$@"
do
    if [ -e "$file" ]
    then
        echo "$file exists"
    else
        echo "$file does not exist"
    fi    
done
share|improve this answer
    
if [ -e "$i" ] is not working –  user2984674 Nov 29 '13 at 11:07
    
Are your files called 1, 2, etc? Do they exist in the directory that you are running the script from? –  dogbane Nov 29 '13 at 11:09
    
no, I just want to see if there is a file that is an argument to –  user2984674 Nov 29 '13 at 11:18
    
oh, then try my updated answer. –  dogbane Nov 29 '13 at 11:37

From man bash, section CONDITIONAL EXPRESSIONS:

Conditional  expressions  are used by the [[ compound
command and the test and [ builtin commands to test
file attributes and perform string and arithmetic
comparisons. [...]

   -a file
          True if file exists.
   -b file
          True if file exists and is a block special file.
   -c file
          True if file exists and is a character special file.
   -d file
          True if file exists and is a directory.
   -e file
          True if file exists.
   -f file
          True if file exists and is a regular file.
   -g file
          True if file exists and is set-group-id.
   -h file
          True if file exists and is a symbolic link.
   -k file
          True if file exists and its ``sticky'' bit is set.
   -p file
          True if file exists and is a named pipe (FIFO).
   -r file
          True if file exists and is readable.
   -s file
          True if file exists and has a size greater than zero.
   -t fd
          True if file descriptor fd is open and refers to a terminal.
   -u file
          True if file exists and its set-user-id bit is set.
   -w file
          True if file exists and is writable.
   -x file
          True if file exists and is executable.
   -G file
          True if file exists and is owned by the effective group id.
   -L file
          True if file exists and is a symbolic link.
   -N file
          True if file exists and has been modified since it was last read.
   -O file
          True if file exists and is owned by the effective user id.
   -S file
          True if file exists and is a socket.

Also, what dogbane said.

share|improve this answer
    
I know how to check availability, but do not know how to iterate the arguments in the loop –  user2984674 Nov 29 '13 at 11:08
    
@user2984674: You might want to consider re-phrasing your question, then. Both answers you got obviously got it wrong; a good indicator that your question is lacking. –  DevSolar Nov 29 '13 at 11:43

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