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I have a few static Dictionary object that holds some constants list for me so I wouldn't have to load them from database each time my website loads (for example: a list of countries, a list of categories).

So I have a static function that checks if the instance is null, and if it is query the database, instantiate the static variable, and populate it with data.

Since it is a website, there could be a case that more than one person tries to access that information at the same time while the object is null, and all those who do will call that process at the same time (which is really not necessary, causes unneeded queries against the DB, and could cause duplicated objects in the list).

I know there's a way to make this kind of loading thread-safe (just not really sure how) - could someone point me in the right direction? should I use a lock?

Thanks

UPDATE II:

This is what I wrote (is this a good thread-safe code?)

private static Lazy<List<ICountry>> _countries  = new Lazy<List<ICountry>>(loadCountries);

private static List<ICountry> loadCountries()
{
        List<ICountry> result = new List<ICountry>();

        DataTable dtCountries = SqlHelper.ExecuteDataTable("stp_Data_Countries_Get");
        foreach (DataRow dr in dtCountries.Rows)
        {
            result.Add(new Country
                {
                    ID = Convert.ToInt32(dr["CountryId"]),
                    Name = dr["Name"].ToString()
                });
        }

        return result;
}

public static List<ICountry> GetAllCountries()
{
    return _countries.Value;
}
share|improve this question
    
Regarding your update: If the lazy loading code throws, the exception will be stored by the Lazy object and always rethrown. The application is hosed, then, until it is restarted. – usr Dec 1 '13 at 9:53
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use Lazy to load a resource in a lazy and thread-safe manner:

Lazy<List<string>> countries = 
    new Lazy<List<string>>(()=> /* get your countries from db */);

Update:

public static class HelperTables
{
   private static Lazy<List<ICountry>> _countries;

   static HelperTables //Static constructor
   {
       //Instantiating the lazy object in the static constructor will prevent race conditions
      _countries = new Lazy<List<ICountry>>(() =>
      {
        List<ICountry> result = new List<ICountry>();

        DataTable dtCountries = SqlHelper.ExecuteDataTable("stp_Data_Countries_Get");
        foreach (DataRow dr in dtCountries.Rows)
        {
            result.Add(new Country
            {
                ID = Convert.ToInt32(dr["CountryId"]),
                Name = dr["Name"].ToString()
            });
        }

        return result;
      });
   }

   public static List<ICountry> GetAllCountries()
   {
      return _countries.Value;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
They write: "Making the Lazy<T> object thread safe does not protect the lazily initialized object. If multiple threads can access the lazily initialized object, you must make its properties and methods safe for multithreaded access." can you explain? – developer82 Nov 29 '13 at 13:57
    
@developer82 It means that you have to handle the thread-safety of the returned object by Lazy<T> by yourself. In this case, for example, the List<string> instance returned is not thread safe, only its construction and initialization is protected by the Lazy<T>. – Alberto Nov 29 '13 at 14:05
    
@Alberto from the example in the page I see that they do use the lock keyword - so does that means I need to use that keyword in any case I want only one thread initializing it? – developer82 Nov 29 '13 at 14:10
    
@developer82 No. In the example the lock is used to synchronize the access to the object (LargeObject) after it was initialized by the Lazy<T>. – Alberto Nov 29 '13 at 14:14
    
Hi, Please check out my UPDATE above - is this a good thread-safe code? or am I off base here? Thanks :) – developer82 Nov 29 '13 at 18:19

If you're using .NET 4.0, you can use the builtin Lazy generic class.

private static Lazy<YourObject> data = new Lazy<YourObject>(YourInitializationFunction);
public static YourObject Data { get { return data.Value; } }

Note that you have to add a static constructor to the class where you define this, otherwise it's not completely thread-safe.

If you're not on .NET 4.0+, you can just write your own code. The basic pattern looks something like this:

private static YourObject data;
private static object syncObject = new object();

public static YourObject Data
{
  get
    {
        if (data == null)
        {
            lock (syncObject)
            {
                if (data != null)
                    return data;

                var obj = new YourObject();

                return (YourObject)Interlocked.Exchange(ref data, obj);
            }
        }

        return data;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
as you are doing is not thread safe – BRAHIM Kamel Nov 29 '13 at 13:25
    
@BRAHIMKamel: Yes, it is. The default value for the thread safety mode is ExecutionAndPublication, which is the version that uses explicit locks, in fact. – Luaan Nov 29 '13 at 13:38
    
ok but not where you should add a new value to the collection – BRAHIM Kamel Nov 29 '13 at 13:55
    
@BRAHIMKamel: Yes, but that wasn't part of the question. The OP asks for a way to safely initialize a constant list from database. He can do that by implementing the YourInitializationFunction any way he wants. Manipulating the data after it is safely loaded is a completely different matter, and not what the OP asked for. – Luaan Nov 29 '13 at 14:04
    
Hi, Please check out my UPDATE above - is this a good thread-safe code? or am I off base here? Thanks :) – developer82 Nov 29 '13 at 18:19

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