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I was going to organize and abridge to following to a much shorter version, but for the sake of remembering specific nuances 6 months from now, I left it in chronological order.

from random import *

class Card:
    def __init__(self):
        self.rank = ['2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10', 'J', 'Q', 'K', 'A']
        self.suit = ['s', 'h', 'c', 'd']
        self.card = choice(rank) + choice(suit)

The code above runs in IDLE. but then when I do >>> c = Card() [enter], I get the traceback below.

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#18>", line 1, in <module>
    c = Card()
  File "C:\Current\MY_PYTHON\Py_OOP_progs\scrap2.py", line 7, in __init__
    self.card = choice(rank) + choice(suit)
NameError: global name 'rank' is not defined

Why is this? I also get almost the same traceback if I change it to include a 'return self.card'; 'return card; or a 'return' to the end of the class definition. If I remove the 'self.' prefixes from the variables (rank, suit, and card), then it runs and I can do >>> c = Card() [enter]; but when I try to do >>> c.card [enter], I get another traceback:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#24>", line 1, in <module>
    c.card
AttributeError: Card instance has no attribute 'card'

...which is kind've what I expected to get and is why I originally added a 'self' prefix to the rank, suit, and card instance variables. The effect I'm wanting to get is, when I do >>> c = Card() [enter], to get c's card instance variable set to have two random values: a random rank and a random suit, as illustrated in the original code. Then, I should be able to instantiate 52 Card() instances and print them out later on in the program. What's a conventional way to do this? Note - there's no particular meaning behind the code - it's mostly arbitrary. I just haven't gotten over the OOP learning curve yet and so instead of reading more material, I figure the lesson will be more interactive and memorable if I just ask outright about my mistakes. Is defining a method in the code necessary?

Also (just a guess), besides getting more hands on experience coding class examples and such, would reading about the two areas of "name spaces" and "scope" in python probably be most relevant to help me understand the shortcomings of the above code?

Some more experimenting (after the fact) that's relevant to the above questions... The code:

from random import *

class Card:
    rank = ['2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10', 'J', 'Q', 'K', 'A']
    suit = ['s', 'h', 'c', 'd']
    card = choice(rank) + choice(suit)

...runs fine, except for the fact that after instantiating Card(), >>> c.card [enter] always gives that same value each time. I finally got something to work. The code below:

class Card:
    global rank
    global suit
    rank = ['2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10', 'J', 'Q', 'K', 'A']
    suit = ['s', 'h', 'c', 'd']

    def make_Card(self):
        card = choice(rank) + choice(suit)
        print card

Runs and allows me to do:

>>> c = Card()
>>> c.make_Card()
5h
>>> c.make_Card()
4h
>>> c.make_Card()
2s

I don't know, though. In this last code, did I happen to stumble upon one conventional way of doing it, 'cause I remember (vaguely) often reading something about declaring globals variables a lot is bad design under some circumstances?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

the first option is in this next code part:

from random import *

class Card:
    def __init__(self):
        self.rank = ['2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10', 'J', 'Q', 'K', 'A']
        self.suit = ['s', 'h', 'c', 'd']
        self.card = choice(rank) + choice(suit)   

to change to :

self.card = choice(self.rank) + choice(self.suit)   

Since the variables rank and suit dont exist when you say self.card = choice(rank) + choice(suit), but self.rank and self.suit do exist

Another option is:

class Card:
    def __init__(self):
        rank = ['2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10', 'J', 'Q', 'K', 'A']
        suit = ['s', 'h', 'c', 'd']
        card = choice(rank) + choice(suit)   
        self.rank = rank
        self.suit = suit
        self.card = card

But i guess the first option is more pythonic

share|improve this answer

You seem to be mixing O-O trouble and Python-syntax trouble.

Your ranks and suits are not object members; they belong to the class; that's an OO remark.

Refer to member variables using the self syntax (which is why you define member methods with a self argument):

class Card(object):
   """variables that are the same for all
   Card instances"""
   ranks = ['2', ..., 'A']
   suits = ['s', 'h', 'c', 'd']

   def __init__(self):
      self.rank = choice(Card.ranks)
      self.suit = choice(Cart.suits)

   def card(self):
      return self.rank + self.suit

   def __repr__(self):
      """standard method to 'print' this object"""
      return self.card()

Note how the data members don't loose information: there's going no problem to check whether two cards are from the same suit: while in the rank + suit solution, you would have to split self.card and remember to take the second item, you only need your card.suit with this design.

Now you can create cards like this:

>>> c1 = Card()
>>> c2 = Card()
>>> cards = [ Card() for _ in xrange(0, 10) ]

Have fun.

share|improve this answer

Any variables stored in an instance of a class needs self. prepended to it to access that variable. Without it, Python looks only in the local namespace, then the global namespace. In IDLE, youve probably defined a rank or suit variable interactively, which the class instance is finding in the global namespace.

To fix the problem:

from random import *

class Card:
    def __init__(self):
        self.rank = ['2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10', 'J', 'Q', 'K', 'A']
        self.suit = ['s', 'h', 'c', 'd']
        # Access the instance's rank and suit. 
        self.card = choice(self.rank) + choice(self.suit)
share|improve this answer

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