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Intro: In cout I expect any values passed by the insertion operator << to be displayed on screen.

Normally one would think that the following code would work without fault:

int n = 0;
cout << n;

And it does, and yes, it is good practice to always use endl. But the problem I am having is very strange (to me at least).

The Problem: I have the following code:

cout << " value at array point 0: "  << (list)[length -1] << endl;
cout << " Retry: " << (list)[length - 1];

list is a pointer pointing towards the 0 index memory location of an array of integers. length is the array length. You would imagine that this code would work without fault, correct? Wrong. For some reason the second line will not display - and I hadn't the slightest clue why. Then I added endl to the end of " Retry: " out of curiosity, and it worked. I don't know why, and it is really bothering me.

Thanks in advance to all help!



Basic overview of code

// Prototype
void listAdd( int* list, int& length );

int main()
{
   /* this program was created for practice with dynamic memmory with arrays.
   It should be able to extend the list, destroy it, and pop from it.
   */
    int length = 0;
    int *list = NULL;

    for( int i = 0; i < 5; i ++)
    {
        listAdd( list, length );
        //listDisplay( list, length);
    }

    cout << " if this has been displayed the program ended correctly." << endl;
    return 0;
}


void listAdd(int *list, int &length) {

    int* tempList = new int[ length + 1 ];
    for( int i = 0; i < length; i ++ )
    {
        (tempList)[i] = (list)[ i ];
    }


    cout << " Enter a number: ";
    int stored = 0;
    cin >> stored;

    cout << endl;
    if ( list != NULL )
        delete[] list;

    cout << " Previous adress: " << hex << list << endl;
    list = tempList;
    cout << " New address: " << hex << list << endl << dec;

    length ++;
    cout << " Length: " << length << endl;
    (list)[length -1] = stored;
    cout << " value at array point 0: "  << (list)[length -1] << endl;
    cout << " Retry: " << (list)[length - 1];
}
share|improve this question
2  
Can you post the full code? With the list initialization and everything. –  Barış Uşaklı Nov 29 '13 at 16:44
4  
endl flushes the stream, IIRC. –  Hulk Nov 29 '13 at 16:45
    
You need to flush the stream if you have not caused that to happen automatically. Sending a newline (endl) will cause the stream to flush. If you really want to flush and keep the cursor on the same line, add cout.flush(); to explicitly flush the buffered stream data. –  Sie Raybould Nov 29 '13 at 16:48
1  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit If I am wrong just say so, I'm new and learning. –  Lemony-Andrew Nov 29 '13 at 16:57
    
@Lemony: I'm asking you, prompting you to think about it for yourself! If you explain why you think that, then we can address specific points in a way that best helps you to understand the issues. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 29 '13 at 17:03

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Streamed output is written to a buffer, and may not be written to the final destination until the stream is flushed. std::endl will insert an end-of-line, and then flush. You can insert std::flush, or call the flush() member function, to flush without inserting an end-of-line, if that's what you want.

it is good practice to always use "endl"

Not really. Flushing too often, especially when writing to a file, can degrade performance.

share|improve this answer

You need to flush stream manually. You should use "cout.flush()" after the code you posted.

What "std::cout << std::endl" does is - it prints '\n' symbol and then it flushes the stream (same as std::cout.flush().

P.S. it's not correct that using "endl" is always a good practice. You should usually use '\n' for printing new line symbols. And use std::endl only in cases like these.

share|improve this answer

endl flushes the stdout stream. Your output is probably just in the buffer waiting to be printed to the screen. There is nothing wrong with the behavior (besides that you did expect something else).

Try a manual flush instead of endl. That should result in the same behavior.

share|improve this answer

Quoting cppreference:

Inserts a endline character into the output sequence os and flushes it as if by calling os.put(os.widen('\n')) followed by os.flush().

So the output is just in the buffer. Outputting more stuff - or explicitly flushing - will cause it to be displayed.

I agree with other answers stating that unnecessarily adding std::endl or more generally flushing more often than you need to is not a good practice.

share|improve this answer

If you added an std::endl to the end of the second output and it worked, it is because endl flushes the stream buffer. Otherwise, you are waiting for the next buffer write to the screen (and if your program exits before that happens, you likely don't see it before it closes the window - it would write it out and close the program almost instantly).

share|improve this answer

You need to flush the stream if you have not caused that to happen automatically.

Sending a newline (endl) will cause the stream to flush.

If you really want to flush and keep the cursor on the same line, add cout.flush() to explicitly flush the buffered stream data. e.g.:

cout << " value at array point 0: "  << (list)[length -1] << endl;
cout << " Retry: " << (list)[length - 1];
cout.flush();
share|improve this answer
    
Sending a newline does not cause the stream to flush. endl sends a newline and causes the stream to flush. There is a subtle but important difference between the two. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 29 '13 at 16:55
    
Yes, this is true except that endl does not always send a newline in fact, this depends on the platform. :-) For instance it is very likely to sent a carriage return and a newline on a PC. –  Sie Raybould Nov 29 '13 at 16:58
    
Actually, endl is defined to always write a '\n' into the stream ([C++11: 27.7.3.8/1]), though the underlying file stream provided by the OS may perform its own line-ending conversion if it wishes. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 29 '13 at 17:05

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