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I'm dealing with small text files that i want to read into a buffer while i process them, so i've come up with the following code:

...
char source[1000000];

FILE *fp = fopen("TheFile.txt", "r");
if(fp != NULL)
{
    while((symbol = getc(fp)) != EOF)
    {
        strcat(source, &symbol);
    }
    fclose(fp);
}
...

Is this the correct way of putting the contents of the file into the buffer or am i abusing strcat()?

I then iterate through the buffer thus:

for(int x = 0; (c = source[x]) != '\0'; x++)
{
    //Process chars
}
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1  
This is wrong. strcat concatenates strings. Even if &symbol is a char *, it is not null-terminated. You should use fgets or fread. Also, strcat is going to be slow in your case anyway because it scans source every time it needs to append one character. –  Alok Singhal Jan 8 '10 at 16:50
7  
Yes, you're abusing strcat. Please stop it. Abusing cats is wrong. –  Paul Nathan Jan 8 '10 at 16:55
    
Not to mention reading a char at a time will be much slower than using fread. –  Nick Meyer Jan 8 '10 at 16:57
    
@Nick: I don't know about 'much slower': because of io buffering and possibly inlining of the function calls, the performance impact needs not necessarily be that large; using fread() is still a good idea, though –  Christoph Jan 8 '10 at 17:07
    
btw: I wouldn't consider a 1m text file 'small' ;) –  Christoph Jan 8 '10 at 17:09
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7 Answers 7

up vote 26 down vote accepted
char source[1000000];

FILE *fp = fopen("TheFile.txt", "r");
if(fp != NULL)
{
    while((symbol = getc(fp)) != EOF)
    {
        strcat(source, &symbol);
    }
    fclose(fp);
}

There are quite a few things wrong with this code:

  1. It is very slow (you are extracting the buffer one character at a time).
  2. If the filesize is over sizeof(source), this is prone to buffer overflows.
  3. Really, when you look at it more closely, this code should not work at all. As stated in the man pages:

The strcat() function appends a copy of the null-terminated string s2 to the end of the null-terminated string s1, then add a terminating `\0'.

You are appending a character (not a NUL-terminated string!) to a string that may or may not be NUL-terminated. The only time I can imagine this working according to the man-page description is if every character in the file is NUL-terminated, in which case this would be rather pointless. So yes, this is most definitely a terrible abuse of strcat().

The following are two alternatives to consider using instead.

If you know the maximum buffer size ahead of time:

#include <stdio.h>
#define MAXBUFLEN 1000000

char source[MAXBUFLEN + 1];
FILE *fp = fopen("foo.txt", "r");
if (fp != NULL) {
    size_t newLen = fread(source, sizeof(char), MAXBUFLEN, fp);
    if (newLen == 0) {
        fputs("Error reading file", stderr);
    } else {
        source[++newLen] = '\0'; /* Just to be safe. */
    }

    fclose(fp);
}

Or, if you do not:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *source = NULL;
FILE *fp = fopen("foo.txt", "r");
if (fp != NULL) {
    /* Go to the end of the file. */
    if (fseek(fp, 0L, SEEK_END) == 0) {
        /* Get the size of the file. */
        long bufsize = ftell(fp);
        if (bufsize == -1) { /* Error */ }

        /* Allocate our buffer to that size. */
        source = malloc(sizeof(char) * (bufsize + 1));

        /* Go back to the start of the file. */
        if (fseek(fp, 0L, SEEK_SET) != 0) { /* Error */ }

        /* Read the entire file into memory. */
        size_t newLen = fread(source, sizeof(char), bufsize, fp);
        if (newLen == 0) {
            fputs("Error reading file", stderr);
        } else {
            source[++newLen] = '\0'; /* Just to be safe. */
        }
    }
    fclose(fp);
}

free(source); /* Don't forget to call free() later! */
share|improve this answer
2  
You probably want to null-terminate your buffer as well. In your second code sample, you left room for the null, but didn't actually set it; in your first, you neglected to leave room for the null. –  Brian Campbell Jan 8 '10 at 17:10
    
@Brian: That's true, I've updated the examples with that in mind. –  Michael Jan 8 '10 at 17:16
    
+1 for the use of ftell and malloc. This is the way to go. –  Coleman Jan 8 '10 at 17:25
1  
@Mark: you're right, and I'm sure you know this, but sizeof(int) can be 1. @Michael, let's say I read a character 'A' in symbol. Then, &symbol (even if symbol is char) is a pointer pointing to 'A' followed by random data. If symbol is an int, and sizeof(int) > 1, then &symbol, when converted to char *, points to 'A' followed by 0 or 0, depending upon the endianness of the machine. –  Alok Singhal Jan 8 '10 at 18:49
1  
stackoverflow.com/a/238607/309483: "If you use ftell, then you must open the file in binary mode. If you open it in text mode, ftell only returns a "cookie" that is only usable by fseek." –  Janus Troelsen Oct 18 '12 at 22:16
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Yes - you would probably be arrested for your terriable abuse of strcat !

Take a look at getline() it reads the data a line at a time but importantly it can limit the number of characters you read, so you don't overflow the buffer.

Strcat is relatively slow because it has to search the entire string for the end on every character insertion. You would normally keep a pointer to the current end of the string storage and pass that to getline as the position to read the next line into.

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What's the alternative? –  Gary Willoughby Jan 8 '10 at 16:47
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Why don't you just use the array of chars you have? This ought to do it:

   source[i] = getc(fp); 
   i++;
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Not tested, but should work.. And yes, it could be better implemented with fread, I'll leave that as an exercise to the reader.

#define DEFAULT_SIZE 100
#define STEP_SIZE 100

char *buffer[DEFAULT_SIZE];
size_t buffer_sz=DEFAULT_SIZE;
size_t i=0;
while(!feof(fp)){
  buffer[i]=fgetc(fp);
  i++;
  if(i>=buffer_sz){
    buffer_sz+=STEP_SIZE;
    void *tmp=buffer;
    buffer=realloc(buffer,buffer_sz);
    if(buffer==null){ free(tmp); exit(1);} //ensure we don't have a memory leak
  }
}
buffer[i]=0;
share|improve this answer
    
wouldn't realloc be slow? –  ajay Jan 13 at 6:18
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See this article from JoelOnSoftware for why you don't want to use strcat.

Look at fread for an alternative. Use it with 1 for the size when you're reading bytes or characters.

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Good article... –  Gary Willoughby Jan 8 '10 at 17:06
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Have you considered mmap()? You can read from the file directly as if it were already in memory.

http://beej.us/guide/bgipc/output/html/multipage/mmap.html

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