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I have a base abstract class, which aggregates a bunch of items in a collection:

abstract class AMyAbstract
{
    List<string> Items { get; private set; }

    public AMyAbstract(IEnumerable<string> items)
    {
        this.Items = new List<string>(items);
    }
}

There are a lot of subclasses, let's name them Foo, Bar, Baz, etc. They all are immutable. Now I need a merge() method, which will merge items of two objects like this:

abstract class AMyAbstract
{
    // ...
    public AMyAbstract merge(AMyAbstract other)
    {
        // how to implement???
    }
}

Foo foo1 = new Foo(new string[] {"a", "b"});
Bar bar1 = new Bar(new string[] {"c", "d"});
Foo fooAndBar = foo1.merge(bar1);
// items in fooAndBar now contain: {"a", "b", "c", "d"}

Since the objects are immutable, the merge() method should not change the state of items field, but instead it should return a new object of the class uppon which it is called. My question is: how to judiciously implement the merge() method?

Problem 1: AMyAbstract is clearly not aware of specific constructors of the subclasses (dependency inversion principle), thus I cannot (or can I?) create instance of the sub class in a super class.

Problem 2: Implementing merge() method in each of the subclasses is a lot of code repetition (DRY rule).

Problem 3: Extracting the merge() logic to a entirely new class does not solve the DRY rule problem. Even using the visitor pattern it is a lot of copy/paste.

The problems presented above rule out any idea of implementation I might have had before I read about SOLID. (my life has been miserable since then ;)

Or is there an entirely different, out-of-the-box approch to achieve the merge of such objects?

I'd appreciate answer in C#, Java or even PHP.

EDIT: I think I left out a piece of valid information: event though there are a lot of different sub classes, they can (should) only be constructed in two, maybe three ways (as an implication of the single responsibility principle):

  • parameterless constructor
  • a constructor which accepts one IEnumerable<T> argument
  • a constructor which accepts array and some other modifier

This would put the visitor pattern back on the tablie if I could put a constraint on the constructors - for example by defining a constructor in an interface. But this is possible only in PHP. In Java or C# a constructor signature cannot be enforced, thus I cannot be certain of how I would instantiate a subclass. This is a good rule in general, because one could never predict of how author of the subclass would like the object be constructed, but in this particular case it might have been helpful. So a helper question would be: can I somehow enforce how a class is instantiated? Builder pattern sounds like way too much in this simple case, or does it?

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1  
I removed the language tags because the question has less to do with an specific language than with OO concepts - but let me say, nice question! –  Renan Nov 29 '13 at 18:03
    
Thanks :) Real-life issue. The language tags were there to attract all those high-level programming language specialists. I'm worried, that they won't come here if they won't see them :( –  Maciej Sz Nov 29 '13 at 18:13
1  
they will come, they will be pissed off that the question is not about those languages, they will say it's off-topic and then downvote and vote to close =\ but I thik your question will attract enough good attention as is. If not, then I'll set a bounty on it later on. –  Renan Nov 29 '13 at 18:23
    
Immutable class will always return new object of the Foo , Bar class. So you need code to merge Foo and Bar object to super class reference. Merging objects in the new class using 'instanceOf' may be a better choice. –  Tathagat Nov 29 '13 at 18:28
2  
note that, if you want immutability, you should not return a List, return a ReadOnlyCollection<T> instead. This is because the user is able to do this: instance.Items.Add(Something) so you should either return a new list or a readOnlyCollection, the second is better since it shows the user he cannot mutate the collection while if you return a copy of the list he may think that he can –  Fabio Marcolini Nov 29 '13 at 18:38
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4 Answers 4

You are right about dependency inversion rule and code duplication problems.

You can write the core implementation of the merge logic in your abstract class and give out the task of creating a new instance to the derived classes. Create an abstract method in your abstract class that will force all the children to implement it. The purpose is this method is to create a new instance of the class and return it. This method will be used by the super class to get a new instance and do the merging.

The resultant java code will look something like this

abstract class AMyAbstract {
    // ...
    public AMyAbstract merge(AMyAbstract other) {
        AMyAbstract obj = getNewInstance();
        // Do the merge
        // Return the merged object.
    }

    protected abstract AMyAbstract getNewInstance();
}

class foo extends AMyAbstract {
    protected foo getNewInstance() {
        // Instantiate Foo and return it.
    }
}

Hope this helps..

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1  
+1 Nice inspiration, an abstract factory creating instances of itself ! –  yechabbi Nov 29 '13 at 18:48
    
This will return instance of AMyAbstract, while getting an instance of the required subclass without repeating code is a bit more complicated. –  svz Nov 29 '13 at 18:52
    
This will not return an instance of AMyAbstract. This will return an instance of Foo itself referencd by AMyAbstract type. In fact, you can change your method signature in your derived class like this : protected foo getNewInstance(). Also updating my answer. –  naveen Nov 29 '13 at 18:58
    
Thank you for this answer, but unfortunetlly it does not solve my problem :( As I outlined: the classes have to be immutable. Thus the getNewInstance() method would have to return a fully constructed object with all appropriate items already set up. In your implementation it does not do so. Altering your code to accept the constructor parameters would actually result in the situation which I described as Problem 2. The getNewInstance() method would basically perform the logic of overriden merge() methods. So we're back to squere 1. Nevertheless +1 from me for your effort. –  Maciej Sz Nov 29 '13 at 20:36
1  
@MaciejSz 1. please read this 2. You could do it the other way around: in the merge method copy and concat the lists, and than pass them as a parameter to the factory method. –  AK_ Nov 29 '13 at 21:42
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OBSOLETE, kept for reference (and shows how I arrived at the final solution), see code after EDIT below

I would say the builder pattern is the way to go. We just need a builder which keeps the instance but modifies the one field that needs to be changed.

If one wants to obtain (as shown in your code)

Foo fooAndBar = foo1.merge(bar1);

an additional generic type definition is needed (thus defining class AMyAbstract <T>) to be able to still produce the correct final type (instead of just seeing AMyAbstract as type for the fooAndBar) in the above call.

Note: merge method was renamed to MergeItems in the code below to make clear what is merged. I specified different constructors for Foo and Bar, so that it is clear that they do not need to have the same number of parameters.

Actually to be truly immutable, the list should not be directly returned in the Items property as it could be modified by the caller (using new List(items).AsReadOnly() produced a ReadOnlyCollection, so I just used this one).

Code:

abstract class AMyAbstract<T> where T : AMyAbstract<T>
{
    public ReadOnlyCollection<string> Items { get; private set; }

    protected AMyAbstract(IEnumerable<string> items)
    {
        this.Items = new List<string>(items).AsReadOnly();
    }

    public T MergeItems<T2>(AMyAbstract<T2> other) where T2 : AMyAbstract<T2>
    {
        List<string> mergedItems = new List<string>(Items);
        mergedItems.AddRange(other.Items);
        ButWithItemsBuilder butWithItemsBuilder = GetButWithItemsBuilder();
        return butWithItemsBuilder.ButWithItems(mergedItems);
    }

    public abstract class ButWithItemsBuilder
    {
        public abstract T ButWithItems(List<string> items);
    }

    public abstract ButWithItemsBuilder GetButWithItemsBuilder();
}

class Foo : AMyAbstract<Foo>
{
    public string Param1 { get; private set; }

    public Foo(IEnumerable<string> items, string param1)
        : base(items)
    {
        this.Param1 = param1;
    }

    public class FooButWithItemsBuilder : ButWithItemsBuilder
    {
        private readonly Foo _foo;
        internal FooButWithItemsBuilder(Foo foo)
        {
            this._foo = foo;
        }

        public override Foo ButWithItems(List<string> items)
        {
            return new Foo(items, _foo.Param1);
        }
    }

    public override ButWithItemsBuilder GetButWithItemsBuilder()
    {
        return new FooButWithItemsBuilder(this);
    }
}

class Bar : AMyAbstract<Bar>
{
    public string Param2 { get; private set; }
    public int Param3 { get; private set; }

    public Bar(IEnumerable<string> items, string param2, int param3)
        : base(items)
    {
        this.Param2 = param2;
        this.Param3 = param3;
    }

    public class BarButWithItemsBuilder : ButWithItemsBuilder
    {
        private readonly Bar _bar;
        internal BarButWithItemsBuilder(Bar bar)
        {
            this._bar = bar;
        }

        public override Bar ButWithItems(List<string> items)
        {
            return new Bar(items, _bar.Param2, _bar.Param3);
        }
    }

    public override ButWithItemsBuilder GetButWithItemsBuilder()
    {
        return new BarButWithItemsBuilder(this);
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Foo foo1 = new Foo(new[] { "a", "b" }, "param1");
        Bar bar1 = new Bar(new[] { "c", "d" }, "param2", 3);
        Foo fooAndBar = foo1.MergeItems(bar1);
        // items in fooAndBar now contain: {"a", "b", "c", "d"}
        Console.WriteLine(String.Join(", ", fooAndBar.Items));
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

EDIT

Perhaps a simpler solution would be to avoid the builder class, and instead have

abstract T ButWithItems(List<string> items);

directly in the base class, and implementing classes would just implement it as currently the builders do.

Code:

abstract class AMyAbstract<T> where T : AMyAbstract<T>
{
    public ReadOnlyCollection<string> Items { get; private set; }

    protected AMyAbstract(IEnumerable<string> items)
    {
        this.Items = new List<string>(items).AsReadOnly();
    }

    public T MergeItems<T2>(AMyAbstract<T2> other) where T2 : AMyAbstract<T2>
    {
        List<string> mergedItems = new List<string>(Items);
        mergedItems.AddRange(other.Items);
        return ButWithItems(mergedItems);
    }

    public abstract T ButWithItems(List<string> items);
}

class Foo : AMyAbstract<Foo>
{
    public string Param1 { get; private set; }

    public Foo(IEnumerable<string> items, string param1)
        : base(items)
    {
        this.Param1 = param1;
    }

    public override Foo ButWithItems(List<string> items)
    {
        return new Foo(items, Param1);
    }
}

class Bar : AMyAbstract<Bar>
{
    public string Param2 { get; private set; }
    public int Param3 { get; private set; }

    public Bar(IEnumerable<string> items, string param2, int param3)
        : base(items)
    {
        this.Param2 = param2;
        this.Param3 = param3;
    }

    public override Bar ButWithItems(List<string> items)
    {
        return new Bar(items, Param2, Param3);
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Foo foo1 = new Foo(new[] { "a", "b" }, "param1");
        Bar bar1 = new Bar(new[] { "c", "d" }, "param2", 3);
        Foo fooAndBar = foo1.MergeItems(bar1);
        // items in fooAndBar now contain: {"a", "b", "c", "d"}
        Console.WriteLine(String.Join(", ", fooAndBar.Items));
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
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I'm a bit late to the party but as you have yet to accept an answer I thought I would add my own.

One of the key points is that the collection should be immutable. In my example I have exposed IEnumerable to facilitate this - the collection of items is immutable outside of the instance.

There are 2 ways I see this working:

  1. a public default constructor
  2. an internal Clone template method similar to @naveen's answer above

Option 1 is less code but really it depends whether an instance of AMyAbstract with no items and no way to change the items is something you want to allow.

private readonly List<string> items;

public IEnumerable<string> Items { get { return this.items; } } 

public static T CreateMergedInstance<T>(T from, AMyAbstract other)
    where T : AMyAbstract, new()
{
    T result = new T();
    result.items.AddRange(from.Items);
    result.items.AddRange(other.Items);
    return result;
}

Seems to satisfy all of your requirements

[Test]
public void MergeInstances()
{
    Foo foo = new Foo(new string[] {"a", "b"});
    Bar bar = new Bar(new string[] {"c", "d"});
    Foo fooAndBar = Foo.CreateMergedInstance(foo, bar);

    Assert.That(fooAndBar.Items.Count(), Is.EqualTo(4));
    Assert.That(fooAndBar.Items.Contains("a"), Is.True);
    Assert.That(fooAndBar.Items.Contains("b"), Is.True);
    Assert.That(fooAndBar.Items.Contains("c"), Is.True);
    Assert.That(fooAndBar.Items.Contains("d"), Is.True);

    Assert.That(foo.Items.Count(), Is.EqualTo(2));
    Assert.That(foo.Items.Contains("a"), Is.True);
    Assert.That(foo.Items.Contains("b"), Is.True);

    Assert.That(bar.Items.Count(), Is.EqualTo(2));
    Assert.That(bar.Items.Contains("c"), Is.True);
    Assert.That(bar.Items.Contains("d"), Is.True);
}

Whether you ultimately choose a default constructor or a template method the crux of this answer is that the Items only need to be immutable on the outside.

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1  
Thanks, this is a very nice implementation! I would probably use it if not the fact that - as you mentioned - the implementation depends on putting the parameterless constructor constraint on the T type. I cannot affort this, as there exist many implementations of this class without one (there are 3 types of constructors as I mentioned) and some of the assemblies which use them are 3rd party, so I would brake their code. Nevertheless +1 and I will use it next time I design a class before pushing it to production :) –  Maciej Sz Dec 3 '13 at 13:53
    
On a side note, the problem presented by me was actually resolved by AK_, but he neglected to put a full answer as of yet. Take a look at this comment and the ones that follow if you are interested. The solution is so simple, that I am ashamed that I did not come up with it on my own :) –  Maciej Sz Dec 3 '13 at 13:55
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

A neat solution based on @AK_'s comment:

tldr: The basic idea is to create a multiple merge methods for each aggregated filed instead of using a merge method for entire object.

1) we'd want a special list type for the purpose of aggregating the items inside AMyAbstract instances, so let's create one:

class MyList<T> extends ReadOnlyCollection<T> { ... }

abstract class AMyAbstract
{
    MyList<string> Items { get; private set; }

    //...
}

The advantage here is that we have a specialized list type for our purpose, which we can alter later.

2) instead of having a merge method for entire object of AMyAbstract we would want to use a method which merly merges the items of that object:

abstract class AMyAbstract
{
    // ...

    MyList<T> mergeList(AMyAbstract other)
    {
        return this.Items.Concat(other.Items);
    }
}

Another advatage we gain: decomposition of the problem of merging entire object. So instead we break it into a small problems (merging just the aggregated list in this case).

3) and now we can create a merged object using any specialized constructor we might think of:

Foo fooAndBar = new Foo(foo1.mergeList(bar1));

Instead of returning the new instance of entire object we return only the merged list, which in turn can be used to create object of target class. Here we gain yet another advantage: deferred object instantiation, which is the main purpose of creational patterns.

SUMMARY:

So not only this solution solves the problems presended in the question, but provides additional advantages presented above.

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