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Why does the following code compile?

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    getchar;
}
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20  
Because its error-free? –  matrixtheone Jan 8 '10 at 16:52
1  
@Xinxua - +1 /agree –  Topher Fangio Jan 8 '10 at 16:52
    
It basically boils down to whether getchar is allowed to be a macro. If it is, the code may not be correct. –  Alexandre C. Oct 12 '12 at 9:19
1  
This question is embarrassing. What a moron I was three years ago. –  missingfaktor Oct 12 '12 at 10:02
    
@missingfaktor not really - it's a valid question. I'd expect an Expression with possibly no effect or other warning (at least), but such is life. –  David Lively Dec 16 '13 at 15:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Because function names are aliases to function pointers to those functions, which are themselves values much like integers.. This is semantically very similar to

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    42;
}

It is valid but pointless.

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2  
And very annoying!!!! typing, "int x = getX" instead of "x = getX()" will work quite happily and put some random address value into x. –  Martin Beckett Jan 8 '10 at 16:56
    
I hate C. >_< [15 char filler] –  missingfaktor Jan 8 '10 at 16:59
1  
@Rahul: That's not a very polyglot like attitude! –  Tarydon Jan 8 '10 at 17:04
6  
@Martin Beckett:Any decent compiler will issue a warning for such an assignment. If yours doesn't, get a better one (or quit disabling all the warnings -- especially in C, you should usually enable all warnings, and treat them as errors. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 8 '10 at 17:12
1  
@Rahul - Polyglot it is! I've always associated polyglot with spoken and multilingual with written (and therefore code), but it appears that I was putting meanings into the words that wasnt' there. –  jball Jan 8 '10 at 18:04

The same reason 1; would compile, getchar is just an address to a function. The result is evaluated, then discarded. In the language specification, it's called an "expression statement";

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C is weird, this code compiles too, but it segfaults which for the record, is the smallest segfault in C history.

main;
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