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So, I wrote simple function changing integers to int arrays (for long int calculations, and now that I think about that I could have used std::stoi... ), but it does not return results that I would expect.

int main(){
int l=0;
printIntArray(toArray(12345,l),l);
return 0;
}

void printIntArray(int* a, int n, char separator){
for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
    std::cout<<a[i]<<separator;
std::cout<<std::endl;
}
void printIntArray(int* a, int n){
for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
    std::cout<<a[i];
std::cout<<std::endl;
}

int power(int a, int p){
for(int i=0;i<p;i++)
    a*=a;
return a;
}

int* toArray(int a, int& l){
l=1;
int p=10;
//find how many digits are there
for(;p<=a;p*=10){
    l++;
}
p/=10;

int* result = new int[l];
for(int i=0;i<l;i++){
    result[i]=a/p;
    a-=result[i]*p;
    p/=10;
}
return result;
}

The thing is, when I debug printIntArray, the value of l is 0. But, before print is called, toArray is called, which should change it's length. If I divide main to

int main(){
int l=0;
int* t=toArray(12345,l);
printIntArray(t,l);

return 0;
}

It gives me the correct result. Why is that? (I'm using Visual Studio 2010)

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5  
Order of evaluation in function calls is unspecified, and by relying on a certain order, your code invokes undefined behavior. –  user529758 Nov 29 '13 at 19:52
    
For being C++ there are no actual reference in the code, just pointers. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 29 '13 at 19:55
    
@H2CO3 curious. Still, why does it evalute functions in "correct" order while debiggin? (And curiosily not keeping the change after leaving function) –  Xyzk Nov 29 '13 at 19:56
    
@JoachimPileborg I feel like Neo in the spoon scene now... there is no Reference. –  Xyzk Nov 29 '13 at 19:57
2  
@Xyzk IDK. That's an implementation detail (and first of all, UB is UB. It cannot be explained.) –  user529758 Nov 29 '13 at 20:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In __cdecl function calls (C style - default in C/C++), arguments are stored right to left on the stack. Some compilers will also evaluate in that order.

I'm not sure if the standard mandates anything, but it's not a good idea to count on the order of parameter evaluation. Such bugs can be hard to find.

I can only recommend avoiding any prior knowledge on parameter evaluation order.

BTW, your problem is asked in job interviews :)

What will be printed here?

int i = 0;
printf("%d %d", ++i. i++);
share|improve this answer

The problem is in order of evaluation variables in function arguments.. Default calling convention in VS is __cdecl - it pushes arguments on the stack, in reverse order (right to left). So in your example it pushes first l=0 to printIntArray, and only after that calls toArray (which changes l value).

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/984x0h58%28v=vs.100%29.aspx for reference.

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