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I'm trying to make a procedure that will capitalize a string, but I get junk values and a warning from gcc that I'm returning the address of a local variable. Coming from Python, I'm confused by this issue. (Don't want to use stuff in <string.h>)

 2
 3
 4char* strcaps(const char *strlower)
 5{
 6  int len = 0;
 7  while (*strlower != '\0'){
 8    len++;
 9    strlower++;
10  }
11  char newStr[len + 1];
12  int i;
13  for (i = 0; i < len; i++)
14    newStr[i] = strlower[i] - 32;
    newStr[len + 1] = '\0';    //EDIT, just put this in.
15  return newStr;
16}
17
18int main(void)
19{
20  
21  
22  
23  printf("I expect capitalized version of edgar, I got %s\n", strcaps("edgar"));
24
25
26  return 0;
27}

I'm guessing I can make a global string and then mutable that, but I'd rather keep everything inside the function strcaps...is this a case when I should use malloc?

Thanks

EDIT: Just realized that I never put a '\0' at the end of the new string, although I'm not sure if that is related.

share|improve this question
    
It is related too, but, as the compiler warning says, you are not supposed to return a pointer to a local (non-static) variable. When the function returns, it vanishes, and you will get back a pointer that doesn't point to anything meaningful. You will have to use malloc(). –  user529758 Nov 29 '13 at 20:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have two options in C.

1) you can pass your function an pointer to the string and function will modify it and return void

In this case you can just use the original string

2) you can pass your function const char* and return char *, but then you need to malloc inside the function

If you do a malloc inside function, you can then use the string (print it or do whatever you want), at the and of the program you call free

share|improve this answer
    
Say I do malloc, I'm just using it as a value for printf, what will happen to that memory? Since I'm not calling free anywhere, will it leak memory? And how could I fix that considering that I'm making the string just inside the procedure strcaps –  Edgar Aroutiounian Nov 29 '13 at 20:21
    
just free it after using printf –  Ján Vorčák Nov 29 '13 at 20:28
    
@EdgarAroutiounian if you malloc it, you need to free it too (or leak memory). So you need a temp variable. This demonstrates how C is a pretty low level language. No objects with automatic destructors, no garbage collection, but no "invisible" overhead either. –  hyde Nov 29 '13 at 20:29

is this a case when I should use malloc?

Yes, exactly.

In your case, you return pointer to local variable, which (the variable) will be destroyed after the execution of the function. This makes the pointer dangling.

Using malloc will create the string in the heap, not stack, and it will remain valid after after the return of the function.

share|improve this answer
    
Say I do malloc, I'm just using it as a value for printf, what will happen to that memory? Since I'm not calling free anywhere, will it leak memory? And how could I fix that considering that I'm making the string just inside the procedure strcaps –  Edgar Aroutiounian Nov 29 '13 at 20:24
    
Yes, it will leak. Well, you're creating the string inside the function, but you're trying to use it outside the funciton and that's the issue here. One way is to store the result in pointer, print it and free it. Or print it inside the function and do not return anything. –  Kiril Kirov Nov 29 '13 at 20:26

First of all, you should always put a null character at the end of a string, because the standard library uses this to denote the actual end of a string, to prevent from walking over memory.

This is an implementation.

/* Makes a copy of the string as to not modify the original buffer */
char* makeCopy(char* s){

    char* buff = (char*) malloc(len(s) + 1);
    strcpy(buff, s);
    return buff;
}

/* Converts the string to uppercase */
char* toUpperCase(char* s){

        char* q = makeCopy(s);
        int i;
        for(i = 0; i < len(q); i++){
                *(q + i) = toupper(*(q + i));
        }

        return q;

}

Now you can do:

printf("I expect capitalized version of edgar, I got %s\n", toUpperCase("edgar"));

Now I understand that you don't want to touch any of the stuff in string.h, but it is useful, for without the functions there you may need to implement much of the stuff on your own.

For example, the function toupper() comes from string.h. This converts a character to its uppercase equivalent. If you insist on reinventing the wheel you can hack a tiny function that handles it.

char getUpperCaseChar(char lower){
    if(lower < 91)
        return lower;
    if(lower > 96)
        return (lower - 32);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I was looking for a way to keep it all in one function. I'm not understanding the need for a buffer. –  Edgar Aroutiounian Nov 29 '13 at 20:25
    
@EdgarAroutiounian I use buffers just so if I need to keep the original string for some reason, I still have access to it. –  turnt Nov 29 '13 at 20:28

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