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PHP Version 5.4.21

having an array (out of an sql query) like this:

Array(

...

 [4] => stdClass Object
    (
        [MakeModel] => Douglas DC-3
        [year] => 2011
        [month] => 4
        [zaehler] => 11
    )

[5] => stdClass Object
    (
        [MakeModel] => Douglas DC-3
        [year] => 2012
        [month] => 4
        [zaehler] => 2
    )

[6] => stdClass Object
    (
        [MakeModel] => Douglas DC-3
        [year] => 2013
        [month] => 3
        [zaehler] => 3
    )
...
)

for usage with javascript charts I need to fill all missing Years/Month until now as "dummy object" in between. So it should look like this:

Array(

[4] => stdClass Object
    (
        [MakeModel] => Douglas DC-3
        [year] => 2011
        [month] => 4
        [zaehler] => 11
    )
[5] => stdClass Object
    (
        [year] => 2011
        [month] => 5
    )
[6] => stdClass Object
    (
        [year] => 2011
        [month] => 6
    )
...
[7] => stdClass Object
    (
        [MakeModel] => Douglas DC-3
        [year] => 2012
        [month] => 4
        [zaehler] => 2
    )
... until today
)

This is my second time/date related question. It's really hard working with php's date/time functions. Thanks for you help!

share|improve this question
    
If this is about your code, I would suggest sharing the relevant parts. –  Jack Nov 29 '13 at 20:42
    
Why are you modifying the row object being returned by your database? –  Zarathuztra Nov 29 '13 at 20:43
    
@jack: No code so far. idea was to loop thru array with a foreach function and fill month and year when not present. Hoping for "more simple solutions" –  TNT_Larsn Nov 29 '13 at 20:53
    
@TNT_Larsn Seems to me, that's exactly what you need to do. –  Jack Nov 29 '13 at 20:54
    
@Zarazthuztra: database does not return data for the missing years/month because there is no data :-( ??? –  TNT_Larsn Nov 29 '13 at 20:55
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1 Answer 1

This actually sounds like something you might consider solving in your database.

Say for example you had a table like this that contained all months within the range you needed

month_id   year   month
1          2011   1
2          2011   2
...
*          20**   12

And you modified your table containing airplane information like this

airplane_id   makemodel     zaehler  month_id
1             Douglas DC-3  11       4
...

You could then do a left join to get ALL months along with aircraft listings where they are matched:

SELECT
  m.`year` AS `year`,
  m.`month` AS `month`,
  a.`makemodel` AS `makemodel`,
  a.`zaehler` AS `zaehler`
FROM `months` AS m
LEFT JOIN `airplanes` AS a
  ON m.`month_id` = a.`month_id`
ORDER BY `year` ASC, `month` ASC

The result set might look like this:

year  month  makemodel     zaehler
2011  1      NULL          NULL
2011  2      NULL          NULL
2011  3      NULL          NULL
2011  4      Douglas DC-3  11
...

This concept of a table with fixed ID's related to increments of time comes from the data warehousing concept of a dimension table. Your will find a date dimension table in most data warehouse concepts (usually with even more granular date/time row values).

This of course does not mean that such a table has usefulness only in data warehousing applications. You made find this sort of table in scheduling applications and other such cases where the concept of "time slots" is required.

share|improve this answer
    
understood, but then I had to update this "dimension table" from time to time because it's endless –  TNT_Larsn Nov 29 '13 at 21:07
    
@TNT_Larsn Typically when one builds a time dimension table, you just make it sufficiently large to cover all realistic use cases (i.e. make the table go through 2050 or something). –  Mike Brant Nov 29 '13 at 21:13
    
@TNT_Larsn If you need something more granular (i.e. you actually have date field you are currently populating, so you need day of month as well), you can Google something like date dimension script to find scripts available to build a date dimension table for you. –  Mike Brant Nov 29 '13 at 21:16
    
Doing this in the database is a great idea honestly. Keeps you from having to process it in your app in the first place. –  Zarathuztra Nov 29 '13 at 22:46
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