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I need to sort an array of strings based on the array of ints.

I have this to sort my int array

    for (int pass = 0; pass < score.Length - ONE; pass++)
    {
        for (int index = 0; index < score.Length - ONE; index++)
        {
            if (score[index] > score[index + ONE])
            {
                int temp = score[index];
                score[index] = score[index + ONE];
                score[index + 1] = temp;
            }
        }
    }

This int and name array were obtained by

Console.Write("Enter in a name and score: ", i);
userInput = Console.ReadLine();
if (userInput != "")
{
    parsedInput = userInput.Split();
    name[i] = parsedInput[ZERO];
    score[i] = int.Parse(parsedInput[ONE]);
}

For my assignment I need to display the name and their scores organized by the highest score.

I know I could use Array.Sort(score, name) to achieve this but the assignment wants me to not use any of the built in sorting algorithms in the .net library, which is assume Array.Sort would be.

Any tips or help would be greatly appreciated.

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Did you actually create a constant for 0 and 1? Could they change at some future date and become const int ZERO = 1; const int ONE = 0? –  Grant Winney Nov 29 '13 at 23:36
    
Yes, ZERO and ONE are constants –  user2781666 Nov 29 '13 at 23:39
1  
@user2781666, 0 and 1 are not magic numbers in this context. An example of a magic number would be something like 2781666 meaning "sort by name, then by date, and return hidden records", which indeed is better abstracted by constants or enumerated flags. –  Frédéric Hamidi Nov 29 '13 at 23:45
2  
@user2781666: The constants ONE and ZERO are still magic numbers, only disguised as constants. To really avoid magic numbers you should use a constant for each use of a number, for example const int ItemDistance = 1; to use in the loop to get to the previous and next item, and const int NameIndex = 0; const int ScoreIndex = 1; to access the items in the array. –  Guffa Nov 29 '13 at 23:50
1  
Oh that makes sense, so when it's a basic algorithm form then 1 and 0 would be ok? That makes a lot more sense –  user2781666 Nov 29 '13 at 23:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to rearrange name when you are sorting score so that they are consistent.

for (int pass = 0; pass < score.Length - ONE; pass++)
{
    for (int index = 0; index < score.Length - ONE; index++)
    {
        if (score[index] > score[index + ONE])
        {
            int temp = score[index];
            score[index] = score[index + ONE];
            score[index + 1] = temp;

            string temp2 = name[index];
            name[index] = name[index + ONE];
            name[index + 1] = temp2;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, that works perfectly. I didn't think it would be that easy. –  user2781666 Nov 29 '13 at 23:46
    
If this answer helped you, you can accept the answer with the check mark to indicate that you no longer require help with this question. –  Justin Dec 3 '13 at 21:12

When you swap the items in the int array, also swap the corresponding items in the string array. That way the values follow each other, and the name and score remain in sync.

Note that the sorting algorithm is an inefficient version of bubble sort. If there are no swaps in a run of the inner loop, the array is sorted and you can exit out of the outer loop.

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