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I have defined the following style for the table

table tbody.center tr td {
    text-align: center;
}

It's purpose is to have content center-align content of cell of the table that has class of tbody equal to 'center'.

Some cells are still required to be left aligned, so I'would like to have an additional style

table tbody tr td.left {
    text-align: left;
}

But that doesn't work exactly I need:

<table>
    <tbody class="center">
        <tr>
            <td class="left">Should be left aligned, but is not</td>
            <td>Center aligned</td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>long text to stretch the table to be big enough to see the alignment</td>
            <td>long text to stretch the table to be big enough to see the alignment</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

In this markup 'td' object alignement has in fact style defined by 'table tbody.center tr td'.

In order to resolve the problem I need to introduce an additional style:

table tbody.center tr td.left 
{
    text-align: left;
}

But I don't want to introduce 'left' for each of my customization.

Is there any way to resolve problem more effectively and to specify priority for the style?

Thank you.

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Your current CSS works just fine to me: jsfiddle.net/d4uKb –  MarcinJuraszek Nov 30 '13 at 1:17
1  
"But I don't want to introduce 'left' for each of my customization." You are obviously not an idiot. I'm completely not understanding what you mean by getting an additional advantage over that though. There has to be some way to differentiate custom. –  Jason Sebring Nov 30 '13 at 1:17
    
I supposed what I mean is please define the pattern in which you want to automagically override. This will make it more clear if this is some jQuery way or CSS possibility of what you are asking. –  Jason Sebring Nov 30 '13 at 1:20
2  
You current CSS works fine for me too! In which browser are you checking? Have you defined a doctype? –  gurudeb Nov 30 '13 at 1:23
2  
If your .center definition comes after your .left definition, it's likely that if you switch the two it will solve your problem. –  Wex Nov 30 '13 at 1:27
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2 Answers

You only need to add !important at the end of the property declaration, just before the semicolon.

This happens because of CSS cascade, and the priority is assigned to your selectors. In your case the first selector is more specific than the second, so it has a higher priority and overrides it.

In your case the two selectors have the same specificity (0,0,1,4), so the latter wins. As stated in the comments you can move the latter rule before the first (and maybe add a comment to remember yourself why that rule has to be before the other, in order to don't get again the problem).

All the properties declared important have higher priority than the normal ones. For more details, give a look to the specifications: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/cascade.html#cascade

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6  
Avoid using !important, unless it is really needed. CSS is Cascading, try to use this behavior. –  Raptor Nov 30 '13 at 1:22
    
Agreed - I'd almost recommend just using inline CSS at this point. –  Wex Nov 30 '13 at 1:23
1  
Agreed with Shivan... Important overrides other stuff but it doesn't follow proper extending... using important tells browser "do your rendering, then check my important syntax"... this is not a good way... it is similar to using "goto" in other programming languages... don't use it unless you can figure out the root cause of an attribute not getting precedence. –  gurudeb Nov 30 '13 at 1:26
    
I don't think this case is an abuse of !important, since we are specifying it on the text-align property of a td element which has class left (and is a descendant of th, and so on). If the author is giving the class left to this specific element, I'd think he wouldn't need to override it or have a different alignment. –  Carlo Cannas Nov 30 '13 at 1:48
1  
!important exists for a reason. Don't be afraid to use it guys. –  Matías Nov 30 '13 at 1:57
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Don't use !important if you can help it. You'll end up making it more difficult to override that style in the future.

There are a number of resources out there for css precedence, but here's a quick refresher:

Universal selectors
Type selectors
Class selectors
Attributes selectors
Pseudo-classes
ID selectors
Inline style

More specific selectors will be applied over less specific selectors. And try not to go crazy with chaining them, you can hurt performance of the browser laying out the page.

Update Not sure the specifics of your entire solution, but you can efficiently override a cell by adding an id to the table and .left to the td.

table tbody.center tr td {
    text-align: center;
}

#some_id td.left {
    text-align: left;
}


<table id="some_id">
    <tbody class="center">
        <tr>
            <td class="left">Should be left aligned, but is not</td>
            <td>Center aligned</td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>long text to stretch the table to be big enough to see the alignment</td>
            <td>long text to stretch the table to be big enough to see the alignment</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

Good luck!

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3  
You may want to offer a solution in addition to your refresher - although this is a good point. –  Wex Nov 30 '13 at 1:23
    
Good suggestion Wex –  ohiodoug Nov 30 '13 at 1:32
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