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With Octave I am able to plot arrays to the terminal, for example, plotting an array with values for the function x^2 gives this output in my terminal:

   10000 ++---------+-----------+----------+-----------+---------++
         ++         +           +          +           +         ++
         |+         :           :          :           :         +|
         |++        :           :          :           :        ++|
         | +        :           :          :           :        + |
         | ++       :           :          :           :       ++ |
    8000 ++.+..................................................+.++
         |  ++      :           :          :           :      ++  |
         |   ++     :           :          :           :     ++   |
         |    +     :           :          :           :     +    |
         |    ++    :           :          :           :    ++    |
         |     +    :           :          :           :    +     |
    6000 ++....++..........................................++....++
         |      ++  :           :          :           :  ++      |
         |       +  :           :          :           :  +       |
         |       ++ :           :          :           : ++       |
         |        ++:           :          :           :++        |
    4000 ++........++..................................++........++
         |          +           :          :           +          |
         |          ++          :          :          ++          |
         |          :++         :          :         ++:          |
         |          : ++        :          :        ++ :          |
         |          :  ++       :          :       ++  :          |
    2000 ++.............++........................++.............++
         |          :    ++     :          :     ++    :          |
         |          :     +++   :          :   +++     :          |
         |          :       ++  :          :  ++       :          |
         |          :        +++:          :+++        :          |
         +          +          ++++      ++++          +          +
       0 ++---------+-----------+----------+-----------+---------++
         0        20000       40000      60000       80000     100000

Is there some way I can do something similar in Python, specifically with matplotlib? bashplotlib seems to offer some of this functionality but appears to be quite basic compared to Octave's offering.

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Do you mind using gnuplot controlled with python? – Jakob Nov 30 '13 at 7:29
    
@Jakob I would be interested in how that works. – Mike Vella Nov 30 '13 at 21:35
1  
I have not played with gnuplot's ascii mode, but from this page it looks similar to what you want: cs.hmc.edu/~vrable/gnuplot/using-gnuplot.html If you want to use gnuplot from python, you could have python write a script file for gnuplot and then use subprocess to call gnuplot on the script file that you just wrote. Not too elegant, but it should work. – DanHickstein Dec 1 '13 at 23:39
up vote 11 down vote accepted

As @Benjamin Barenblat pointed out, there is currently no way using matplotlib. If you really want to use a pure python library, you may check ASCII Plotter. However, as I commented above, I would use gnuplot as suggested e.g. in this question.

To use gnuplot directly from python you could either use Gnuplot.py (I haven't tested this yet) or use gnuplot with the scripting interface. Latter can be realised (as suggested here) like:

import numpy as np
x=np.linspace(0,2*np.pi,10)
y=np.sin(x)
import subprocess
gnuplot = subprocess.Popen(["/usr/bin/gnuplot"], 
                           stdin=subprocess.PIPE)
gnuplot.stdin.write("set term dumb 79 25\n")
gnuplot.stdin.write("plot '-' using 1:2 title 'Line1' with linespoints \n")
for i,j in zip(x,y):
   gnuplot.stdin.write("%f %f\n" % (i,j))
gnuplot.stdin.write("e\n")
gnuplot.stdin.flush()

This gives a plot like

    1 ++--------+---A******---------+--------+---------+---------+--------++
      +         + **      +A*       +        +         +      Line1 **A*** +
  0.8 ++        **           *                                            ++
      |       **              **                                           |
  0.6 ++     A                  *                                         ++
      |     *                    *                                         |
  0.4 ++   *                                                              ++
      |  **                       A                                        |
  0.2 ++*                          *                                      ++
      |*                            *                                      |
    0 A+                             *                              A     ++
      |                               *                            *       |
 -0.2 ++                               *                          *       ++
      |                                 A*                      **         |
 -0.4 ++                                  *                    *          ++
      |                                    **                 *            |
 -0.6 ++                                     *               A            ++
      |                                       *            **              |
 -0.8 ++                                                 **               ++
      +         +         +         +        + A****** **        +         +
   -1 ++--------+---------+---------+--------+--------A+---------+--------++
      0         1         2         3        4         5         6         7

Some styling options can be found e.g. here.

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The last line should be replaced with: gnuplot.stdin.write("exit\n"); gnuplot.stdin.flush(); gnuplot.wait() – pjvandehaar Jan 7 at 23:20

If you’re constrained to matplotlib, the answer is currently no. Currently, matplotlib has many backends, but ASCII is not one of them.

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You can also try Sympy's TextBackend for plots, see doc. Or just use textplot.

Here it is an example

from sympy import symbols
from sympy.plotting import textplot
x = symbols('x')
textplot(x**2,0,5)

with the output

24.0992 |                                                      / 
        |                                                    ..  
        |                                                   /    
        |                                                 ..     
        |                                               ..       
        |                                              /         
        |                                            ..          
        |                                          ..            
12.0496 | ---------------------------------------..--------------
        |                                     ...                
        |                                   ..                   
        |                                 ..                     
        |                              ...                       
        |                           ...                          
        |                        ...                             
        |                   .....                                
        |              .....                                     
      0 | .............                                          
          0                      2.5                        5    
share|improve this answer
    
This is sweet, but how would I plot a timeseries with this (or an arbitrary list of values) rather than a parametric function? Does sympy/texplot support such a thing? – Thomas Browne Mar 15 '15 at 9:15
    
I don't know, I have never used that way. Probably, there is a workaround defining a function that returns the values that one has as "time series". – nicoguaro Mar 15 '15 at 12:41

If you just need a quick overview and your x-axis is equally spaced, you could also just make some quick ascii output yourself.

In [1]: y = [20, 26, 32, 37, 39, 40, 38, 35, 30, 23, 17, 10,  5,  2,  0,  1,  3,
   ....:         8, 14, 20]

In [2]: [' '*(d-1) + '*' for d in y]
Out[2]: 
['                   *',
 '                         *',
 '                               *',
 '                                    *',
 '                                      *',
 '                                       *',
 '                                     *',
 '                                  *',
 '                             *',
 '                      *',
 '                *',
 '         *',
 '    *',
 ' *',
 '*',
 '*',
 '  *',
 '       *',
 '             *',
 '                   *']

If your y-data are not integers, offset and scale them so they are in a range that works. For example, the above numbers are basically ( sin(x)+1 )*20.

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