Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

tring to parse this file :

https://gist.github.com/anonymous/7714935

that looks like :

metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line 
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line
metadata line

col1   col2         col3    UTCDate   UTCTime       col6       col7   
                           (m)      (MDY)     (sec)    (weeks)      (MDY)     
string1- string2-        0.000 11/06/2013 313585.10 1765.00000 11/06/2013 
string1- string2-        0.000 11/06/2013 313585.30 1765.00000 11/06/2013 
...

i can read it using a code like :

import pandas as pd
import datetime as dt
names=['col1','col2','col3','UTCDate','UTCTime','col6','col7']

def parse(UTCDate,UTCTime):
    return dt.datetime.strptime(UTCDate, '%m/%d/%Y') + dt.timedelta(seconds=float(UTCTime))

df = pd.read_csv(filename, delimiter=r'\s+', skiprows=25, index_col='date', parse_dates={'date':['UTCDate','UTCTime']}, names=names, date_parser=parse)

Is there a way to avoid to specify the "names" in a list, and try to parse the header instead ?

header is the line :

col1   col2         col3    UTCDate   UTCTime       col6       col7

line 24 in the gist. I was thinking to keep_date_col=True, header=0 and pass a list of lines to skip like [arange(0,23),25] .. but didn't worked.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

I think your general approach is ok. Where I think it fails, for me at least, is with the delimiter and the Longitude / Latitude columns. Your delimiter is '\s+' however the data in these columns then looks like three columns rather than one.

Latitude        Longitude
41 20 54.57907  -70 38 14.25924

Maybe you could replace all double whitespaces with a tab and use the tab as a delimiter. Alternatively, if you only need the first seven columns, simply remove the remainder before giving it to the dataframe.

share|improve this answer
    
I need all the columns, i reduced the example to 7 col, to reduce the complexity of the question. the problem with : latitude and longitude is solved because in the names i declared additional columns ('LatD','LatM','LatS','LonD','LonM','LonS') –  user1013346 Nov 30 '13 at 5:42
    
I should use a converter on the 2 field to store the longitude and latitude values using a different notation (decimal degree perhaps) so to preserve the same columns names in the df as in the header. –  user1013346 Nov 30 '13 at 5:48
    
I reckon both approaches should be ok. Did you get it to work? –  pandita Nov 30 '13 at 7:35
    
Not yet, trying your approach i've trouble to understand how replace the separator, without looping trough the file line by line (my real data can hundred thousands lines). Once i got this resolved i can try to use "linecache.getline" in order to generate the list of "names" : header = linecache.getline(r, 24) " ".join(header.split()).split(' ') –  user1013346 Nov 30 '13 at 14:07
    
nothing, the replacing double space with tabs will work but not for all the columns, some of them are single spaced –  user1013346 Nov 30 '13 at 23:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.