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could someone explain what this small Perl script does? Thanks.

#!/usr/bin/perl
my ($file, $from, $to) = @ARGV;
my $fh;
my $matching = 0;
open($fh, $file) or die $!;
while(<$fh>)
{
    if(/\Q$from\E/) { $matching = 1; }
    if($matching) { print $_; }
    if($matching && /\Q$to\E/) { last; }
}
close($fh);
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migrated from unix.stackexchange.com Nov 30 '13 at 4:43

This question came from our site for users of Linux, FreeBSD and other Un*x-like operating systems..

    
Also see the answers to this identical question. –  DavidRR Dec 1 '13 at 1:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This script takes three parameters:

  1. Filename to read
  2. Start expression
  3. End expression

and prints everything between (including) start expression (second parameter) and end expression (third parameter). If you have a file with the following content:

111
222
333
444
555
666

./script.pl filename 333 555 will print 333, 444 and 555.

More details

my ($file, $from, $to) = @ARGV;

This line assigns the command line arguments to $file, $from and $to. This shows/gives you the required/different command line arguments.

my $fh;
my $matching = 0;

These two lines just declare and initialize two variables used later.

open($fh, $file) or die $!;

Try to opens the first passed argument and assign it to $fh or exit the program if the file can't be opened.

while(<$fh>)
{

This just iterates over the file content

    if(/\Q$from\E/) { $matching = 1; }

The \Q and \E are perl specific for regular expressions. This prevents interpreting special characters as regular expressions. If the current line contains contains $from, $matching is set to one.

       if($matching) { print $_; }

if $matching is set, print the current line

    if($matching && /\Q$to\E/) { last; }

if $matching is set and $tois in the current line, exit the loop

}
close($fh);

close the file

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It opens a file finds the first line that matches the from pattern, prints it, and all lines up to and including the first line that matches to after from, and exits.

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+1 This is more accurate than Ulrich's description: The script prints entire lines, so it will print some material before and after the start & end patterns. –  alexis Nov 29 '13 at 22:51

[Not an answer, just a very long comment]

It's more common to place input files at the end of the argument list. If the script had the calling convention

script from to file

instead of

script file from to

then the script could be written as follows:

#!/usr/bin/perl
my $from = shift;
my $to   = shift;
while (<>) {
   print if /\Q$from\E/ .. /\Q$to\E/;
}

It has the advantage of accepting input from STDIN if file is omitted. It also has the advantage of accepting more than one file names.

An equivalent one-liner follows:

perl -ne'BEGIN{($f,$t)=splice(@ARGV,0,2)} print if /\Q$f\E/../\Q$t\E/' file

Note: These two version find all matching sections instead of just the first. I'm not sure if that's a relevant difference or not.

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