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I have a shell script that I want to get the date and time 30 minutes ago in GMT.

I have this working great for full hours, but partial hours don't seem to work:

1 hour ago

TZ=GMT+1 date +%Y-%m-%d" "%H:%M:%S 2010-01-08 17:43:57

2 hours ago

TZ=GMT+2 date +%Y-%m-%d" "%H:%M:%S 2010-01-08 16:44:07

1/2 hour ago

TZ=GMT+.5 date +%Y-%m-%d" "%H:%M:%S 2010-01-08 18:44:38

tried lots of combinations of 0.5 1.5, no partial hours seem to work, which is weird because there are some timezones that are not full offset of an hour.

any suggestions?

cant use perl or ruby needs to be regular shell or mysql call.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

date -u --date="-30 minutes"

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3  
In case you are on OS X, the equivalent option is: date -u -v-30M –  Max Jan 8 '10 at 18:56
    
thanks, would be ideal if I had one that worked on both linux centos and osx, but I can live with 2 versions for now. –  Joelio Jan 8 '10 at 19:09
    
As well as "-30 minutes", you can say "30 minutes ago", which matches that part of your question exactly. –  camh Jan 10 '10 at 1:51

You can also do this:

TZ='UTC+0:30' date
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Works on Mac OS X and Ubuntu. –  trashgod Jan 9 '10 at 9:48
    
That's right only should be +0:30 to shift other way –  alexsergeyev Apr 12 '13 at 16:20
1  
@alexsergeyev: Thanks for the correction. –  Dennis Williamson Apr 12 '13 at 19:07
 /usr/bin/env TZ='GMT' date -d '-30 minutes'

This is with the version of the date command that's part of the GNU coreutils. I don't know if it works for other versions of the date program.

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this one didnt work on osx or centos for me. –  Joelio Jan 8 '10 at 19:08
    
Can you post the error? –  Noufal Ibrahim Jan 8 '10 at 19:12

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