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I have a little bit of code that looks just like this:

function StrippedExample(i1, i2, i3, i4, i5, i6, i7, i8) {
    this.i = [];
    for (var i=1,j=0 ;i<9;i++) {
        var k = eval("i"+i);
        if (k > 0) {
            this.i[j++] = k;
        }
    }
}

FireBug profiler claims that second longest function is eval(), taking up to nearly 6% of the run time.

Everyone says eval is EVIL (as in bad) and slow (as I have found), but I can't really do anything else - the server simply pulls the data out the database and pushes to the browser.

What alternatives do I have? I could do the same as I am doing here on the server but that just shifts the burden higher up the chain. I can't change the database layout since everything hooks into those 8 variables and is a massive undertaking.

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3  
Hopefully this will help show people that you never have to use eval. –  ChaosPandion Jan 11 '10 at 2:37

7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted
function StrippedExample(i1, i2, i3, i4, i5, i6, i7, i8) {
    var args = [i1, i2, i3, i4, i5, i6, i7, i8]; // put values in an array
    this.i = [];
    for (var i=0,j=0 ;i<8;i++) { // now i goes from 0-7 also
        var k = args[i]; // get values out
        if (k > 0) {
            this.i[j++] = k;
        }
    }
}

The above code can be simplified further, I just made the minimal change to get rid of eval. You can get rid of j, for example:

function StrippedExample(i1, i2, i3, i4, i5, i6, i7, i8) {
    var args = [i1, i2, i3, i4, i5, i6, i7, i8];
    this.i = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < args.length; i++) {
        var k = args[i];
        if (k > 0) { this.i.push(k); }
    }
}

is equivalent. Or, to use the built-in arguments object (to avoid having your parameter list in two places):

function StrippedExample(i1, i2, i3, i4, i5, i6, i7, i8) {
    this.i = [];
    for (var i = 1; i < arguments.length; i++) {
        var k = arguments[i];
        if (k > 0) { this.i.push(k); }
    }
}

Even if you weren't filtering the list, you don't want to do something like this.i = arguments because arguments is not a real Array; it has a callee property that you don't need and is missing some array methods that you might need in i. As others have pointed out, if you want to quickly convert the arguments object into an array, you can do so with this expression:

Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments)

You could use that instead of the var args = [i1, i2 ... lines above.

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1  
This code is currently incorrect, as it's using 1-indexing while the array is 0-indexed. It's also definitely more complicated than it needs to be, as you could just replace args with the built in arguments array, and not define it yourself. –  Brian Campbell Jan 8 '10 at 19:01
    
Thanks for catching that, Brian. I think I fixed it. –  benzado Jan 8 '10 at 19:02
1  
Now you've missed the if (k > 0) part from the original. –  Brian Campbell Jan 8 '10 at 19:12
1  
Another reason to not do this.i = arguments is that arguments is also missing properties you might want in i, since it isn't an array. –  Matthew Crumley Jan 8 '10 at 20:03
1  
A better example would be this.i = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments). –  Eli Grey Jan 9 '10 at 0:17
  1. Call the function with one argument — an Array
  2. Use the arguments object
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This code should be made to use the arguments array that every Javascript function has access to.

It's not that eval is evil (it's in Lisp, so it must be good) it's simply a sign of a hack - you need something to work and you forced it. It screams out to me "The author gave up on good programming design and just found something that worked".

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I'm not au fait with all the ins and outs of Javascript. I can hack around to get things done, but as demonstrated here, it's not always the best way. –  graham.reeds Jan 9 '10 at 1:17

Given that there is a fixed amount of variables, you can build an array of them manually and loop through it. But if you have a variable amount of arguments, one way to get the variables passed to the function as an array is:

var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments.callee.caller.arguments);

And your function would look like this:

function StrippedExample() {
    var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments.callee.caller.arguments);
    for(var i in args) {
        if (args[i] > 0) {
            this.i[j++] = args[i];
        }
    }
}
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you need to edit out the k with args[i] and initialize the j –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Jan 8 '10 at 18:58
1  
You shouldn't use for..in to iterate arrays. A simple for loop is better. –  JPot Jan 8 '10 at 18:59

You are simply making an array from your function 8 arguments, removing the ones that are less than or equal to zero.

The following code is equivalent, and it will work for any arbitrary number of arguments:

function StrippedExample() {
  var args = [];

  for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {
    if (arguments[i] > 0) {
      args.push(arguments[i]);
    }
  }
  //...
}
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Don't forget the if (k > 0) part. –  JPot Jan 8 '10 at 18:58
    
@JPot, thanks, added the condition... –  CMS Jan 8 '10 at 19:05

One alternative to to pass an array to your function, instead of individual arguments:

StrippedExample([3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9, 2, 6])

Then your code would be:

function StrippedExample(inArray) {
    this.i = [];
    for (var i=0,j=0 ;i<inArray.length;i++) {
        var k = inArray[i];
        if (k > 0) {
            this.i[j++] = k;
        }
    }
}

If you really need to pass in separate arguments, you can access them using your arguments array, which is an object that acts like an array (though it's not really; not all Array methods work on it) that exposes all arguments that have been passed in to your function; they do not even need to be declared in this case, but it's good form to include a comment indicating what sorts of arguments you are expecting for users of your code:

function StrippedExample(/*i1, i2, i3, i4, i5, i6, i7, i8*/) {
    this.i = [];
    for (var i=0,j=0 ;i<arguments.length;i++) {
        var k = arguments[i];
        if (k > 0) {
            this.i[j++] = k;
        }
    }
}

If you're guaranteed to only have 8 elements, then you could use 8 in place of inArray.length or arguments.length; I decided to use the more general version in my examples in case that was helpful to you.

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beat me by 10 secs .. –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Jan 8 '10 at 18:59
function StrippedExample() {

    this.i = [];
    for (var i=1,j=0 ;i<arguments.length;i++) {
        var k = arguments[i];
        if (k > 0) {
            this.i[j++] = k;
        }
    }
}
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