Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It's a Java (using JUnit) enterprise Web application with no mock objects pre-built, and it would require a vast amount of time not estimated to create them. Is there a testing paradigm that would give me "some" test coverage, but not total coverage?

share|improve this question
    
I think you may be mis-understanding what a mock object is - you don't pre-build them, you write them specifically for each test. Are you referring to stubs, or dummy implementations, or that sort of thing? –  skaffman Jan 9 '10 at 17:09
    
Why would you write the same mock object multiple times if it is used in several tests? For instance, Spring provides a "pre-built" MockHttpServletRequest that you can use outside of a running servlet container. –  Brian Reindel Jan 9 '10 at 22:46

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Have you tried a dynamic mocking framework such as EasyMock? It does not require you to "create" a Mock object in that you would have to write the entire class - you specify the behavior you want within the test itself.

An example of a class that uses a UserService to find details about a User in order to log someone in:

//Tests what happens when a username is found in the backend
public void testLoginSuccessful() {
    UserService mockUserService = EasyMock.createMock(UserService.class);

    EasyMock.expect(mockUserService.getUser("aUsername")).andReturn(new User(...));
    EasyMock.replay(mockUserService);

    classUnderTest.setUserService(mockUserService);

    boolean isLoggedIn = classUnderTest.login("username");
    assertTrue(isLoggedIn);
}

//Tests what happens when the user does not exist
public void testLoginFailure() {
    UserService mockUserService = EasyMock.createMock(UserService.class);

    EasyMock.expect(mockUserService.getUser("aUsername")).andThrow(new UserNotFoundException());
    EasyMock.replay(mockUserService);

    classUnderTest.setUserService(mockUserService);

    boolean isLoggedIn = classUnderTest.login("username");
    assertFalse(isLoggedIn);
}
share|improve this answer

(1) Alternatives to unit-testing (and mocks) include integration testing (with dbUnit) and FIT testing. For more, see my answer here.

(2) The mocking framework Mockito is outstanding. You wouldn't have to "pre-build" any mocks. It is relatively easy to introduce into a project.

share|improve this answer

I would echo what others are saying about EasyMock. However, if you have a codebase where you need to mock things like static method calls, final classes or methods, etc., then give JMockit a look.

share|improve this answer

Well, one easy, if not the easiest, way to get an high level of code coverage is to write the code test-first, following Test-Driven Development (TDD). Now that the code exists, without unit tests, it can be deemed as legacy code.

You could either write end-to-end test, external to your application, those won't be unit tests, but they can be written without resorting to any kind of mock. Or you could write unit tests that span over multiple classes, and only mock the classes that gets in the way of your unit tests.

share|improve this answer

Do you have real world data you can import into your testbed to use as your 'mock objects' that would be quick

share|improve this answer

I think the opposite is hard - to find a testing methodology that gives you total coverage, if at all possible in most cases.

share|improve this answer

You should give EasyMock a try.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.