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I couldn't find functions in matlab's API (including in the statistical toolbox) that implement functions which get as input: $\mu$ and $\sigma$ for normal distribution and plot the PDF and CDF. If there are functions like that please mention them.

I am afraid the two functions I implemented bellow are missing something, since I get maximal value for pdfNormal which is greater than 1, so I normalize it anyway.

function plotNormPDF(u,s,color)
    mu = u; 
    sigma = s; 
    x = (mu - 5 * sigma) : (sigma / 100) : (mu + 5 * sigma); 
    pdfNormal = normpdf(x, mu, sigma);
    string = 'the maximal pdfNormal is';
    string = sprintf('%s :%d', string,max(pdfNormal));
    disp(string)
    plot(x, pdfNormal/max(pdfNormal),color); 
end

And for the CDF norm

function plotNormCDF(u,s,color)
    mu = u; 
    sigma = s; 
    x = (mu -  5*sigma) : (sigma / 100) : (mu + 5*sigma); 
    pdfNormal = normpdf(x, mu, sigma);
    plot(x,cumsum(pdfNormal)./max(cumsum(pdfNormal)),color)
end

Here is an example for using both:

plotNormCDF(0.2, 0.1,'r')
plotNormPDF(0.2, 0.1,'r')

enter image description here

enter image description here

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migrated from stats.stackexchange.com Nov 30 '13 at 14:42

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4  
It's fine if the maximal value of the pdf is greater than 1: the density under the curve needs to integrate to 1. Consider this: take a single point on the pdf and set its value to 1 million. The area under this point is still 0, and so the area under the pdf is unaffected. Alternatively, consider a uniform distribution on [0,.5]: to integrate to one, the pdf equals 2 everywhere in the support. For more, reference the following whuber comment and the links he provides: stats.stackexchange.com/questions/47714/… –  David Marx Nov 30 '13 at 13:38
    
Also see stats.stackexchange.com/questions/4220/… –  Glen_b Nov 30 '13 at 14:59
1  
"unlike a probability, a probability density function can take on values greater than one" in the Wikipedia page that you refer to. –  A. Donda Nov 30 '13 at 15:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your function plotNormPDF is correct except that you should not divide by the maximum. As David Marx wrote, there is no upper constraint on the values that a probability density function can attain, only a constraint regarding its integral over the range of possible values.

function plotNormPDF(u,s,color)
mu = u;
sigma = s;
x = (mu - 5 * sigma) : (sigma / 100) : (mu + 5 * sigma);
pdfNormal = normpdf(x, mu, sigma);
string = 'the maximal pdfNormal is';
string = sprintf('%s :%d', string,max(pdfNormal));
disp(string)
plot(x, pdfNormal,color);
end

Your function plotNormCDF is correct in principle, but probably not very precise because it approximates an integral by a cumulative sum. Better to use the function normcdf. Normalization of the maximum to 1 here is neither necessary nor does it have an effect.

function plotNormCDF(u,s,color)
mu = u;
sigma = s;
x = (mu -  5*sigma) : (sigma / 100) : (mu + 5*sigma);
cdfNormal = normcdf(x, mu, sigma);
plot(x,cdfNormal,color)
end
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+1 for the explanations –  Luis Mendo Nov 30 '13 at 15:42
    
Thx! :-) ...... –  A. Donda Nov 30 '13 at 15:47

You don't need all that code, look how simpler it is:

mu = 0.2; sigma = 0.1;
x = linspace (mu-4*sigma, mu+4*sigma);
plot(x, normpdf (x,mu,sigma))
plot(x, normcdf (x,mu,sigma))
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Just add a third argument to linspace to achieve finer sampling of the x axis –  Luis Mendo Nov 30 '13 at 15:42
2  
"study to count"? –  A. Donda Nov 30 '13 at 15:53
1  
@0x90, I don't understand your comment, study to count? –  juliohm Nov 30 '13 at 16:30
    
1. linspace(mu-4*sigma, mu+4*sigma, 10000) is better. 2. I don't see how you reduced the number of the lines of code significantly. –  0x90 Dec 1 '13 at 14:36

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