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I have to code for a security project a shellcode. Just for training, I want to code a shellcode which open a very simple MessageBox. Here's below an extract of the whole code (this piece of code just call the 'LoadLibrary' and 'ExitProcess' function):

.386
.model flat, stdcall
option casemap:none

include \masm32\include\windows.inc

.code

start:    
    jmp short GetLibrary

GetLibraryReturn:
    pop ecx                     ;recover 'user32.dllN'
    mov ebx, 758c4977h          ;recover LoadLibrary PTR
    push ecx                    ;push 'kernel.dll'
    call ebx                    ;invoke LoadLibrary

ender:
    push eax
    mov eax, 758c79b0h          ;ExitProcess
    call eax

GetLibrary:
    call GetLibraryReturn
    db 'user32.dll'
    db 00h

[...]

end start

As you can see, it's very simple. However as you can at the end of the code, there's the following instruction :

db 00h

Unfortunately, after compilation, I have an opcode '00' in the middle of the shellcode. To fix the problem there's a solution like this one :

.386
.model flat, stdcall
option casemap:none

include \masm32\include\windows.inc

.code

start:    
    jmp short GetLibrary

GetLibraryReturn:
    pop ecx                     ;recover 'user32.dllN'
    xor edx, edx                ;init EDX register
    mov [ecx + 10], dl          ;replace 'N' by 'NULL'
    mov ebx, 758c4977h          ;recover LoadLibrary PTR
    push ecx                    ;push 'kernel.dll'
    call ebx                    ;invoke LoadLibrary

ender:
    push eax
    mov eax, 758c79b0h          ;ExitProcess addr
    call eax                    ;invoke 'ExitProcess'

GetLibrary:
    call GetLibraryReturn
    db 'user32.dllN'            ;Push an additional character 'N'

end start

So, the subtility is to add another character at the end of the 'user32.dll' original string. Next we just have to replace it by NULL initializing the edx register to 0 and executing the following instruction with the usage of a 8 bits register to replace the 'N' additional character :

mov [ecx + 10], dl    ;'10' corresponds to the 'user32.dll' string length

As you can see the two versions should execute the same thing. It's just the generated code which undergoes a modification. Unfortunately, the execution fails and I don't understand why. Maybe there is a keyword to add on the expression above. I tried severals combinations but the compilation failed. I'm really lost.

Thanks a lot in advance for your help.

share|improve this question
    
It fails either because you are writing to the code segement, or executing code in the stack segement (depends on how this code is executed). Either condition can cause an exception if the appropriate permissions are not enabled. I don't see thouhg, why the 0 byte at the end should matter, as it will be in the same position as the N from the string. –  Devolus Nov 30 '13 at 18:05
    
I don't understand. In C language, if I allocate a string of 11 characters, I can replace the 10th character by another one. I have the permission because I'm in the space I have allocated. I think it's the same thing using ASM or MASM. Do you think the expression is not correct ? Should I use another syntax ? The 0 is important because as you know it mark the end of the string. Otherwise, the program does not work. –  user1364743 Nov 30 '13 at 18:23
    
If you have it allocated you can modify it, but you didn't allocate it, you declared it in the code segemnt which is not writable by default. –  Devolus Nov 30 '13 at 18:24
    
Ok. But the 'pop ecx' expression should extract the string information and put it in the ecx register. Do you think the data is still not writable ? –  user1364743 Nov 30 '13 at 18:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A code segment is not writable, so if you define a string in the code segment you can not write to it, by default. You either have to declare it in the data segment, or you must modify the permissions of the code segment in order to be able to write to it.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually I write a shellcode so I can't stock informations in the .data segment. So your second proposition should be the correct one in my situation. But I don't see at all how I could change the permissions. Thanks in advance for your help. –  user1364743 Nov 30 '13 at 18:42
    
If the string data is pop from the stack and put into the ecx register the information is still not writable ? –  user1364743 Nov 30 '13 at 18:52
    
You must either copy the string somewhere writable (i.e on the stack) or you may not modify it., in wchich case you have to prepare it, theay it is needed beforehand, or you mus modify the permissions. Feel free to accept the answer. The pop ecx only pops the adress, not the location of the string. ;) –  Devolus Nov 30 '13 at 20:59
    
Ok :). Here's a link, vividmachines.com/shellcode/shellcode.html, which talks about what you said (I think). The author said "Well, in most shellcode the assembly contained within has some sort of self modifying qualities. Since we are working in protected mode operating systems the .code segment of the executable image is read only. That is why the shell program needs to copy itself to the stack before attempting execution." I don't understand how to copy the code to the stack befor attempting execution. How can I do that ? Thanks a lot in advance for your help. –  user1364743 Nov 30 '13 at 21:43
1  
You must look at VirtualProtect. –  Devolus Nov 30 '13 at 22:58

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