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The point of the program is to send data from 1 array to another array I'm not sure what's wrong with how I'm passing it. It should enter the data in 1 array then call upon the copy function and puts itself there and then the array is traversed.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<limits.h>
#include<math.h>
#include<ctype.h>
#include<stdbool.h>


double copy_arr(double source[n][u],double target[n][u],int n,int u);

int main(void)
{
    double source[3][5]={{1.1,2.2,3.3,4.4,5.5},
                 {1.1,2.2,3.3,4.4,5.5},
                     {1.1,2.2,3.3,4.4,5.5}};
    double target1[3][5];


    copy_arr(source,target1,3,5);

    int j;
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<3;i++)
    {
        for(j=0;j<5;j++)
        {
        printf("%f 1",target1[i][j]);

        }
    }



    return 0;
}

double copy_arr(double source[][],double target[][],int n,int u)
{
    int i,j;
    for(i=0;i<n;i++)
    {
       for(j=0;j<u;j++)
       {
          target[i][j] = source[i][j];
       }
    }

    return target[n][u];
}
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your function prototype is wrong because compiler has not seen n and u yet. Your program does not even compile. Change

 double copy_arr(double source[n][u],double target[n][u],int n,int u);  

to

 double copy_arr(int n,int u,double source[n][u],double target[n][u]);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks :D i didnt think it mattered because it worked that way with a 1 dimentional array –  user3052741 Nov 30 '13 at 18:23
    
But this is the case of 2 dimensional array. :D –  haccks Nov 30 '13 at 18:24
    
Actuall only u needs to be seen before the array declarations, as the leading array dimension isn't part of the variable array parameter type. Which is also why it 'works' with 1D arrays... –  Chris Dodd Nov 30 '13 at 18:42
    
@ChrisDodd; Yes you are right. That's fine for source[][u]. But for source[n][u], n is also not seen by the compiler at that time that's why you need to pass it. –  haccks Nov 30 '13 at 20:01
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Or you could do hardcoded array size

#define SIZE_ARR 5

void copy_arr(double source[][SIZE_ARR], double target[][SIZE_ARR], int n, int u);

int main(void)
{
    double source[3][SIZE_ARR]={{1.1,2.2,3.3,4.4,5.5},
                         {1.1,2.2,3.3,4.4,5.5},
                         {1.1,2.2,3.3,4.4,5.5}};
    double target1[3][SIZE_ARR];


    copy_arr(source,target1, 3, 5);

    int j;
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<3;i++)
    {
        for(j=0;j<5;j++)
        {
            printf("%f 1",target1[i][j]);
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

void copy_arr(double source[][SIZE_ARR], double target[][SIZE_ARR], int n, int u)
{
    int i,j;
    for(i=0;i<n;i++)
    {
       for(j=0;j<u;j++)
       {
          target[i][j] = source[i][j];
       }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I never seen such type of function prototype in C!! I think for multidimensional arrays you must specify column rather than row, Isn't it? –  haccks Nov 30 '13 at 18:25
    
@haccks Thanks, I am not awake today :-) –  benjarobin Nov 30 '13 at 18:33
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