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I have two .cpp files, one called practice.cpp, and the other called adder.cpp. they are both inside the Source Files folder.

the fists code is shown below:

// adder.cpp

#include "stdafx.h" //include library


int addition(int a, int b) //start function
{
    int r = 0; //declare variables
    r = a + b; //actual code
    return r; //output of function
}

The second code:

// Practice.cpp

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "adder.cpp"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;


int main(void)
{
    int number1 = 0;
    int number2 = 0;
    int number3 = 0;

    do 
    {
        printf("\n\nInsert value for first number\n\n");
        scanf("%d",&number1);

        printf("\nthe value ");
        printf("%d ",number1);
        printf("has been stored in memory location ");
        printf("%d",&number1);

        printf("\n\nInsert value for second number\n\n");
        scanf("%d",&number2);

        printf("\nthe value ");
        printf("%d ",number2);
        printf("has been stored in memory location ");
        printf("%d",&number2);

        number3 = addition(number1,number2);

        printf("%d",number3);



    }
    while (1==1);

    return 0;
}

But the code will not compile. I get the error:

1>------ Build started: Project: Practice, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------
1>  Practice.cpp
1>c:\users\craig\documents\3rd year work\progamable     systems\practice\practice\practice.cpp(25): warning C4996: 'scanf': This function or     variable may be unsafe. Consider using scanf_s instead. To disable deprecation, use     _CRT_SECURE_NO_WARNINGS. See online help for details.
1>          c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\stdio.h(304)     : see declaration of 'scanf'
1>c:\users\craig\documents\3rd year work\progamable     systems\practice\practice\practice.cpp(33): warning C4996: 'scanf': This function or     variable may be unsafe. Consider using scanf_s instead. To disable deprecation, use     _CRT_SECURE_NO_WARNINGS. See online help for details.
1>          c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\stdio.h(304)     : see declaration of 'scanf'
1>Practice.obj : error LNK2005: "int __cdecl addition(int,int)" (?addition@@YAHHH@Z)     already defined in adder.obj
1>C:\Users\Craig\Documents\3rd year work\Progamable Systems\Practice\Debug\Practice.exe     : fatal error LNK1169: one or more multiply defined symbols found
========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

I've been looking all over the web, but it looks like i'm doing it correctly. What can I do to fix this? Thanks!

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5  
Don't include cpp files. –  chris Nov 30 '13 at 19:00
    
"already defined in adder.obj" is telling you that you defined the function twice, which violates ODR. –  Raymond Chen Nov 30 '13 at 19:29
    
@user34248 could you please mark any answer as the correct answer? :) –  Dídac Pérez Dec 11 '13 at 8:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Do not include .cpp files, that's the reason the compiler tells you about multiple definitions. You must create a header .h file and include it in your two .cpp files, and put the following:

// adder.h

#ifndef ADDER_H
#define ADDER_H

int addition(int, int);

#endif

That preprocessor sentences will tell the compiler to define only once the method addition. It works, good luck :)

share|improve this answer
    
I have edited my answer :) –  Dídac Pérez Nov 30 '13 at 19:10

When you #include adder.cpp, the entire code from this file is copied on to this location. Hence you end up with 2 definitions of addition function.

This is why it is recommended to not include cpp files but header files with include guards.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, but where are the two definitions of addition? I define it in the adder.cpp file, but I only use it in the practice.cpp file. It is defined once, and used once. Or am I getting confused? Please can you explain exactly how I have defined it twice? Thanks! –  Blue7 Nov 30 '13 at 19:14
    
As I said in my answer, when you include a file, it is the same as writing the exact code of adder.cpp in practice.cpp. hence the function definition of addition now effectively appears in both the files. This is why the linker is complaining. –  user1990169 Nov 30 '13 at 19:24
    
@user34248 Two files become compiled: adder.cpp and Practice.cpp, we call these files compilation units. These two independent compilation units now have each a definition of addition(). In the end, all compilation units become linked together. When the linker now tries to link your project, he will mutter that there are two definitions of the function addition() as it is in adder.cpp and also in Practice.cpp –  Paranaix Nov 30 '13 at 19:26

Remove #include "adder.cpp" and just use the forward declaration before main function:

int addition(int a, int b);
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