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Can somebody help. I am renaming nodes but, loosing formatting. My XML is:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<root>    
<demo></demo>
</root>

and i am transforming it with XSLT below. Output is always:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<root>    
<description pstyle="description"></description>
</root>

But correct XML output need to be:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<root>    
<description aid:pstyle="description"></description>
</root>

Is there a way that this would not happen with XSLT transformation?

My XSLT is:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
<xsl:output method="xml" indent="no"/>
<xsl:template match="@* | node()">
            <xsl:copy>
                <xsl:apply-templates select="@* | node()"/>
            </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>
    <xsl:template match="demo">
<description aid:pstyle="description"><xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
</description>
</xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Thanks in advance for all your help.

share|improve this question
    
You need to include at least the root nodes of the XML and the root node and following formatting tags of your XSLT. Otherwise we can only guess what's wrong. –  Marcus Rickert Nov 30 '13 at 20:39
    
Marcus i have corrected my question above. –  eoglasi Nov 30 '13 at 21:10
4  
Your stylesheet is incomplete. I see no namespace declaration for the "aid:" prefix. It is not well-formed XML, and so it cannot be the stylesheet you are trying to use. If your processor is accepting the above instance as XML, then you have a non-conforming processor. –  G. Ken Holman Nov 30 '13 at 21:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming that you actually want well-formed XML output...

Your input XML:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<root>    
  <demo></demo>
</root>

Given to your XSLT modified to define the aid namespace prefix:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
                xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
  <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>
  <xsl:template match="@* | node()">
    <xsl:copy>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="@* | node()"/>
    </xsl:copy>
  </xsl:template>
  <xsl:template match="demo">
    <description xmlns:aid="http://example.com/aid"
                 aid:pstyle="description">
      <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
    </description>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Will produce this well-formed output XML:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<root>    
  <description xmlns:aid="http://example.com/aid" aid:pstyle="description"/>
</root>

Update per OP's comment:

This is working, but can i have output xml without xmlns:aid="example.com/aid"; in tag description?

Your comment along with your question title "Special characters in XML with XSLT transformation" suggest that you do not understand XML namespaces. The aid: characters before the pstyle attribute are not special characters. They are a namespace prefix. Namespaces are not required in XML, but if you're going to use a namespace prefix such as aid: you must define it (eg xmlns:aid="http://example.com/aid") for the document to be namespace-valid. For an explanation of namespace-valid and namespaces in general, see Namespaces in XML 1.0.

If you use the aid: prefix without defining it, the document will be not be namespace-valid. XSLT is capable of outputting a non-namespace-valid document, or even non-well-formed XML, but there's nearly never a legitimate reason to do so. Note that the definition could occur on root if that's more to your liking.

share|improve this answer
    
This is working, but can i have output xml without xmlns:aid="example.com/aid"; in tag description? –  eoglasi Dec 1 '13 at 6:26
1  
Thanks for your answer, and yes i know i formed question wrong. Nevertheless your solution solves my problem. –  eoglasi Dec 1 '13 at 7:15

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