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I have a master branch and a staging branch.

Now the usual workflow is that new changes happen in master then from staging I run a

git rebase master.

However due to the nature of my deployment infrastructure I've had to commit a whole bunch of fixes as I was debugging directly into the staging branch. What's the right way to bring these changes back into master so that my future git rebase will work well.

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Have you tried rebasing master on top of staging? git checkout master git rebase staging –  Aiias Nov 30 '13 at 22:08
    
That could be a mess... If there are just a handful of specific changes you could try cherry-picking them into master. –  Iguananaut Nov 30 '13 at 22:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Rebase staging onto master. You'll have this:

         |
master - o
         |
         x
         |
         x - staging

You want this:

         |
         o
         |
         x
         |
master - x - staging

There's only one operation you need to do. Set master to point to the same commit that staging points at. There are umpteen ways to set master to point at the same commit as staging; here's one:

git checkout master
git reset staging

A simple pull should be equivalent as well. Since master is an ancestor of staging, merging staging will be a fast-forward, unless you have configured --no-ff somewhere, which we can detect with --ff-only:

git checkout master
git pull --ff-only staging

Edit: if there are commits you don't want to add back into master, make a new branch, then use rebase -i to keep just the commits that need to go back to master like this:

git checkout staging
git checkout  -b mypics

Yielding

         |
master - o
         |
         y
         |
mypics - x - staging

rebase mypics, dropping y, creating x':

git rebase -i master
# Drop the lines with commits you don't want to send back to master.

         |
master - o
         | \
         y  x' - mypics
         |
         x - staging

Then set master to point to the same commit as mypics, using reset or pull as described above. Then drop mypics:

git checkout master
git reset mypics
git branch -D mypics
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By the way. I'm 99% sure that this works exactly as advertised, but back up your repo before doing it. –  masonk Nov 30 '13 at 22:35
    
I do this stuff daily, and never backup (history is all immutable; reflog helps you find lost commits), but I would suggest making sure you don't have any uncommitted changes in the working tree before a reset --hard operation, or you'll lose them permanently. –  Gary Fixler Nov 30 '13 at 23:15
    
You're right. I took out the --hard. If he has a dirty working tree git will explain to him and he can decide what to do. –  masonk Dec 1 '13 at 13:17
    
I think you still want the --hard in there. Without it, you'll move master up to mypics, but you'll leave the working tree in the same state it was back on master. This is useful sometimes, but in this case you want master and mypics at the same place, so you need --hard to also reset the work tree to match. You could also just git merge mypics, which will fast-forward move master to mypics for you (no need for the implied fetch that comes with pull). That's probably the safe way, as it would quit on conflicts. –  Gary Fixler Dec 2 '13 at 11:07
    
Re: merge v push: I didn't see anything in the OP to imply that master and staging were in the same repo. I presume that's working locally on his version of staging at some point. –  masonk Dec 2 '13 at 15:24

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