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A converter such as what follows will cause the 2008 visual studio designer to not display the xaml, and error out with a "Specified cast is not valid." exception.

public class ItemsVisibilityToGridColumnWidthConverter : IMultiValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object[] values, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        //THE TWO OFFENDING LINES...
        var itemsVisibility = (Visibility)values[0];
        var orientation = (Orientation)values[1];

        if (orientation == Orientation.Horizontal && itemsVisibility != Visibility.Visible)
        {
            return new GridLength(0);
        }

        return new GridLength(4, GridUnitType.Star);
    }

    public object[] ConvertBack(object value, Type[] targetTypes, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Changing the cast to use a method such as this fixes the issue:

static class EnumCaster
{
    internal static Orientation CastAsOrientation(object value)
    {
        if (value is Enum)
        {
            return (Orientation)value;
        }
        return Orientation.Horizontal;
    }
    internal static Visibility CastAsVisibility(object value)
    {
        if (value is Enum)
        {
            return (Visibility)value;
        }
        return Visibility.Visible;
    }
}

My question is, wtf is wrong with the Visual Studio designer? And, is there a better way to cast these objects to their corresponding Enum in such a way that the designer doesn't throw a fit?

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"wtf is wrong with the Visual Studio designer?" I have a list, but this Internet is too small to contain it. –  itowlson Jan 8 '10 at 21:03
    
Could you post the XAML where you use this converter ? –  Thomas Levesque Jan 8 '10 at 21:22
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2 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I think it might happen because at some point, the converter is called with bad arguments. You can debug the call the converter in the designer by following these steps :

  • start a new instance of Visual Studio
  • attach to the first VS instance (Tools -> Attach to process)
  • open the converter source file
  • put a breakpoint in the Convert method
  • reload the WPF designer in the first VS instance

That way you should be able to examine the arguments passed to the converter

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2  
+1 for the nice tip on debugging converters in the designer –  mattythomas2000 Jan 8 '10 at 21:39
2  
The designer is sending a DependencyProperty.UnsetValue. Thanks for the tip on debugging the designer. –  Eric Dahlvang Jan 8 '10 at 23:29
    
Starting in Visual Studio 2012, the WPF Designer runs in a separate process named XDesProc.exe. You should attach to this process from the new instance of Visual Studio. –  Chad Nouis Oct 31 '13 at 15:54
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I think the designer is processing the converter in the first example and is unable to cast because values[0] and values[1] are null. If you do checks for null then this should resolve the problem. The second example is essentially checking for null whilst using the "is" keyword.

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Casting null to anything (reference type) doesn't throw an exception. The more likely reason is that values[0] and values[1] should be swapped around... –  Aviad P. Jan 8 '10 at 21:18
3  
@Aviad, enums are not reference types, they are value types... casting null to a value type throws a NullReferenceException –  Thomas Levesque Jan 8 '10 at 21:27
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