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sI've been having some trouble with this function for a bit now. I managed to reverse it out of some assembly code, and have gotten it to work perfectly. But I can't do the opposite of what it does. Here is what I mean:

Here is my code

ushort storedVal = 12525; //Value to extract actual index out of
byte[] block = BitConverter.GetBytes(storedVal);
uint aVal = block[0];
uint bVal = block[1];
uint index = Convert.ToUInt32((aVal >> 2) & 0x300) | bVal; //Extracting actual index

As you can see, it performs a Bitshift (to the right by 2), an AND on the result on the bitshift, and then ORs the result of that by bVal (or the second byte in the byte array of 12525).

The result that is stored in index is an index into a table/list. In this case it is 48/

I'm having trouble getting that index back into a number like that. Basically undoing what that code does.

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1  
I don't think it's possible. But I'm waiting for someone to prove me wrong :) –  MarcinJuraszek Dec 1 '13 at 0:14
1  
If the range (0..1023) is smaller than the domain (0..uShort max), then you know for sure that the function is not reversible, because multiple input numbers must map to the same output number. –  mbeckish Dec 1 '13 at 0:36
    
It would help if storedVal was narrowed more than being an int. Otherwise it's impossible as noted by others above. –  BartoszKP Dec 1 '13 at 0:52
    
@Bartos I didn't mean to have storeVal as an int, fixed it. (it wasn't in my actual code) –  XBLToothPik Dec 1 '13 at 0:57
    
Do you always start with the storedVal? Or do you sometimes start with the index? If you always derive the index from the storedVal (as I imagine you do), then the reverse is simply a matter of referring to the storedVal. –  Sam Axe Dec 1 '13 at 1:16

3 Answers 3

There isn't enough information in the index to get back to the original value. to perform a reverse of the operation here, you would need to know the aVal and the bVal used to reach the index, which aren't being stored. without knowing these, the reverse function has infinite answers.

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If the input value is ushort then you can easily find the preimage of the argument with brute-force approach. However, because the function is not reversible you're likely to get more than one result:

public static uint getIndex(ushort value)
{
    byte[] block = BitConverter.GetBytes(value);
    uint aVal = block[0];
    uint bVal = block[1];
    return  Convert.ToUInt32((aVal >> 2) & 0x300) | bVal;
}

public static void Main()
{
    uint givenIndex = 192;

    for (ushort i = ushort.MinValue;;++i)
    {
        if (givenIndex == getIndex(i))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Possible input: " + i);
        }

        if (i == ushort.MaxValue)
        {
            break;
        }
    }
}

Note also that for some arguments you won't get any results, as the function is also not a surjection.

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There's either a bug in your code or you've transcribed it incorrectly. aVal is a byte, so (aVal >> 2) & 0x300 is always going to be zero. This means that index has the same value as bVal, which is the first byte of storedVal. This means that you can rewrite the whole function as (storedVal >> 8). Therefore, given the return value of this function you can easily determine one byte of the input, but the other byte could have been anything (since it doesn't affect the output).

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