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I believe something on this code chunk is not properly coded making it incompatible on XHTML 1.0 Transitional.

The code snippet collapses div and then on click they will expand.

Can somebody see what could be wrong?

<script type="text/javascript">

function toggle(div){
el = document.getElementById(div);
    if (el.style.display == 'none')
    {
        el.style.display = '';
    } else {
        el.style.display = 'none';
    }
}

</script>

I have this before the <BODY> tag. If I remove the DOCTYPE another menu I have stops working but then the rows expand by default and aren't collapsed.

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2  
clearly not enough jQuery :) –  Scott Anderson Jan 8 '10 at 21:44
3  
Obligatory firebug comment –  Mike Robinson Jan 8 '10 at 21:45
    
Are you passing in the ID of the div and not the class? –  zmbush Jan 8 '10 at 21:45
1  
e) Not enough information to answer the question. –  Triptych Jan 8 '10 at 21:58
    
Our magic ball is broken so we can not see the rest of your code. How are you calling it? What does the element that expands and collapses look like? Do you have error messages in the error console? What browser is it failing in? –  epascarello Jan 9 '10 at 0:00
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4 Answers

  1. You should check if passed argument is valid (e.g. not undefined, empty string, etc.).
  2. You should check if document.getElementById(div) found the element (e.g. even valid name will not work while document is loading and <script> is earlier in the source than element you're referring to).
  3. You're creating global variable el (put var in front of assignment).
  4. W3C recommends Transitional DTD should be avoided whenever possible, and today it is possible not to use <font> and bgcolor. Use XHTML Strict, unless you don't know what a MIME type is, then use HTML5.
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Instead of el.style.display = ''; try el.style.display = 'block';.

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4  
that would be worse. display='' nicely reverts to default, which may need to be table-row, inline, etc. –  porneL Jan 8 '10 at 21:47
    
@porneL - Does it revert to the default on all browsers? –  Topher Fangio Jan 8 '10 at 21:50
2  
Yes. Perfectly in all cases. .style is just convenient interface to HTML style attribute. It's not a actual computed style of the element, so there's no harm in removing the override (just like there is no harm in removing style attribute from HTML). –  porneL Jan 8 '10 at 21:53
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You shouldn't set the style.display = '', but rather set it to 'block', 'inline' or 'table-row'.

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or use table-row –  darren Jan 8 '10 at 21:49
    
@darren - Thanks, updated my answer. –  Shawn Steward Jan 8 '10 at 22:01
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

It ended up being a problem with a simple display css attribute on the div. There was a markup error.

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