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I have a number of default methods in interfaces that need synchronization and it seems that only this is available:

default void addUniqueColumns(List<String> names) {
    synchronized (this) {
        ... do something
    }
}

The problem is, I want to synchronize on a private lock instead of this for better control:

default void addUniqueColumns(List<String> names) {
    synchronized (lock) {  // how to get a private lock in a default method??
        ... do something
    }
}

Solutions? Clever workarounds? Or just live with it :) !

share|improve this question
    
Object lock = new Object(); – Maroun Maroun Dec 1 '13 at 11:28
    
@MarounMaroun I posted that answer, but this is about interface default methods. I'll have to check more. – chrylis Dec 1 '13 at 11:29
2  
@SaintHill Could you add an Object lockObject(); method to the interface that the default method could reference? – chrylis Dec 1 '13 at 11:29
    
hmmm... don't think so. Can't add private method to interface ... – Saint Hill Dec 1 '13 at 11:31
2  
You are about to abuse a language feature. An interface is meant to stay an interface regardless of whether it has default methods or not. What you are going to write is an abstract class. So just use an abstract class for it instead of abusing the interface with default methods feature. – Holger Dec 3 '13 at 9:51
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can put the lock object into a pubic static field of a package-visible class, letting all your default methods share the lock. The lock remains visible inside your library, but since classes with default access are not visible outside your library, the lock would be private to the users of your interface outside your library:

class LockHolder { // Package private class
    public static Object LOCK = new Object();
}

public interface ColumnCollection {
    default void addUniqueColumns(List<String> names) {
        synchronized (LockHolder.LOCK) {
            ... do something
        }
    }
}

As far as your library is concerned as a whole, this trick gives you the same advantages as using a private lock object does compared to synchronizing on this, because it prevents malicious code written by outsiders from accessing your lock. Of course the lock can be grabbed by any part of your library.

share|improve this answer
1  
That is an interesting approach. Though, I am not sure I want a lock than can be shared within the package. I get that this is probably an impossibility and the methods will have to be moved to abstract classes. – Saint Hill Dec 1 '13 at 13:48
    
@SaintHill There is no absolute protection in Java, at least not as long as it has reflection. The choice is yours - abstract class gives you far less flexibility, but the lock could be private to the class. Package-private static members, on the other hand, could be avoided with an abstract class. – dasblinkenlight Dec 1 '13 at 19:16
    
Interestingly enough I was actually asking myself a few hours ago why someone would try to do this with default methods and not with plain old abstract classes. What's the advantage? – mwhs Dec 1 '13 at 20:38
    
@mwhs That's a great question. I wrote something up about extension methods in C# a few years ago, the same reasoning applies to Java's default methods. – dasblinkenlight Dec 1 '13 at 22:55
    
@dasblinkenlight So default methods basically tell the developer to stop abusing/distorting inheritance to avoid redundancy? That's pretty cool. The other day I was thinking about how many patterns in OOD exist that actually deal with just avoiding redundancy or enforcing DRY. – mwhs Dec 2 '13 at 7:09

You could add a getLock() method to your interface and have each implementor return the object to lock over.

share|improve this answer
    
That wouldn't be a private lock object that the OP wants, though, very much defeating the purpose. – dasblinkenlight Dec 1 '13 at 11:40
    
Fair point, although I don't think it's possible to do that within an interface. The lock inside the implementor can, of course, be private though. – ksasq Dec 1 '13 at 11:41

For the heck of it (and some entertainment value) let's see what might be feasable ...

I put the lock object into a static field of a package-visible class, letting all my default methods share the lock. A lock provider provides instances their own lock on-demand. The lock is removed from the collection when the instance is garbage collected.

The lock provider creates a lock the first time it is requested from an instance and then returns the same lock thereafter. It looks like this:

final class LockProvider {

    private static final WeakHashMap<Widget,Object> widgetLocks = new WeakHashMap<>();

    static Object obtainLock(Widget w) {
        synchronized (widgetLocks) {            
             return locks.computeIfAbsent(w, x -> new Object());
        }
    }

}

And now the default interface method looks like this:

public interface Widget{

    default void addSomething(List<String> names) {
        synchronized (LockProvider.obtainLock(this)) {
            ... do something
        }
    }

}

One weakness of this is that the WeakHashMap uses Object.hashcode() and Object.equals(). Another is that, although fast, it is not super-high-performance. Although this way of doiung it seems clever ... any method that requires synchronization on a private lock would be better designed in another way.

[UPDATED]

What I did in the end was:

1) create default methods:

public interface Widget{

    default void addSomething(List<String> something) {
        ... do something 
    }
}

2) Then created both regular and thread-safe implementations

public class WidgetImpl implements Widget{
    ...
}

// Threadsafe version
public class WidgetThreadsafeImpl implements Widget{

    private final Object lock = new Object(); 

    public void addSomething(List<String> something) {
        synchronized(lock){
            super.addSomething(something);
        }
   }

}

The default method provides an algorithm and the implementations can provide the thread-safe or non-thread-safe implementations.

share|improve this answer
    
"You should fix your design and use an abstract class rather than an interface instead of inventing such kludges. " Do I hear an echo?? Read the preamble! As for the synchronize .. There I fixed it. :) – Saint Hill Dec 4 '13 at 22:39
1  
Yes, you heard an echo. Some things are too important to be told just one time. ;^) Btw. if going for such a workaround, the best solution would be using a concurrent map (which provides an atomic computeIfAbsent) together with a custom key class derived from WeakReference, wrapping the Widget and using System.identityHashCode of the widget as its own hashCode. This would solve all flaws at once. – Holger Dec 5 '13 at 9:12
    
@Holger smart idea! Feel free to edit the answer here with your fix. Or I will when I get a chance. – Saint Hill May 6 '14 at 7:39

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