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I want to create a few instance of this class

var fruit = {
    texture: new Image(),
    speed: 5,
    x: 0,
    y: 0,
};
function fruits(speed, x, y) 
{
    fruit.speed = speed;
    fruit.x = x;
    fruit.y = y;
    return fruit;
};

but when i create new object the all value was overridet by last created object. How can i repair this? My loop:

var apples = [];

for(var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    apples[i] = new fruits(5, Math.floor((Math.random()*775)+1), 0);
    apples[i].texture.src = "_img/apple.png";
}
share|improve this question
    
Where do you initialize apples as an array? Make sure you do it outside the scope of the for loop. –  DevlshOne Dec 1 '13 at 14:41
1  
a constructor should use this.blah as attributes, not an external object, and it shouldn't return anything. –  Dave Dec 1 '13 at 14:43
    
Are you trying to use a factory pattern? –  Musa Dec 1 '13 at 14:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The other answers which are appearing here are just bizarre. Here's the solution:

function fruits(speed, x, y) 
{
    this.texture = new Image( );
    this.speed = speed;
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
};

Notice that the keyword this is used to set attributes. That means that when you call

var apple = new fruits( blah blah );

then apple will be set to a new object which has texture, speed, x and y attributes. There is no need to reference some global object to store these; they are stored in the newly created object itself.

Also I would rename it; the convention is to use singular names and a capital first letter for objects, so Fruit would make more sense (allowing new Fruit(...))

share|improve this answer
function Fruit( speed, x, y ){
    var fruit = {};   // or use some base object instead of {}

    fruit.texture = new Image();
    fruit.speed   = speed || 5;
    fruit.x       = x || 0;
    fruit.y       = y || 0;

    return fruit;
};

var apples = [];

for( var i=0; i<10; i++ ){        
    apples[i] = Fruit( 5, Math.floor((Math.random()*775)+1), 0 );
    apples[i].texture.src = "_img/apple.png";
}

Douglas Crockford - Power Constructor, 'new', 'this' and more

share|improve this answer

You got an object here:

var fruit = {
    texture: new Image(),
    speed: 5,
    x: 0,
    y: 0, // Note the superflous comma, which might break the code in some IE versions
};

And a function here:

function fruits(speed, x, y)  {
    fruit.speed = speed;
    fruit.x = x;
    fruit.y = y;
    return fruit;
};

The function modifies above object whenever it is called and returns it.

Now, what you want is a constructor, but you don't have one here.

This, would be a constructor for a new Fruit:

function Fruit(speed, x, y) {
    this.texture = new Image();
    this.speed = speed || 5; // Note: Using logical OR to emulate default values for the argument
    this.x = x || 0;
    this.y = y || 0;

    // Note: There is no return here!
}

var a = new Fruit(2, 1, 10);
var b = new Fruit(4, 10, 20);
a === b; // Returns false, you got two instances :)

new may have the functionality of being able to create instances of a Function, but you can still override this behavior by returning manually from within the constructor Function.

Also, even if you left out the return fruit in your original code, you would get back an empty instance of fruits since you don't assign any properties to the newly created instance.

In my Fruit example I reference the instance object via the this keyword, so I can assign speed, image, x and y to each instance created.

You might also want to read:

share|improve this answer
function fruits(speed, x, y) {
    return {
        texture: new Image(),
        speed: speed,
        x: x,
        y: x,
    }
};
share|improve this answer

Try such constructor:

function Fruit(speed, x, y) {
    return {
        speed: speed,
        x: x,
        y: y
    }
}

alert(new Fruit("mySpeed", 1, 2).speed);
share|improve this answer
    
I have already written the same. You forgot texture parameter. –  vz_ Dec 1 '13 at 14:48

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