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I have a table with entries that have a version field.

I would like to set the version field to some global unique counter when ever I update or insert a row, like a combined AUTO_INCREMENT on insert or CURRENT_TIMESTAMP on update. Is it possible to do that within an SQL statement for MySql?

Example:

+---+------+-----------+
|id | name |version    |
+---+------+-----------+
|1  |a     |1          |
|2  |b     |2          |
|3  |c     |3          |
+---+------+-----------+

UPDATE my_tbl SET name=foo WHERE id=1

+---+------+-----------+
|id | name |version    |
+---+------+-----------+
|1  |foo   |4          |
|2  |b     |2          |
|3  |c     |3          |
+---+------+-----------+

INSERT INTO my_tbl SET name=bar

+---+------+-----------+
|id | name |version    |
+---+------+-----------+
|1  |foo   |4          |
|2  |b     |2          |
|3  |c     |3          |
|4  |bar   |5          |
+---+------+-----------+

I can not use AUTO_INCREMENT as it is only applied when inserting rows, but not when updating. CURRENT_TIMESTAMP is neither a solution, since a timestamp might not be unique in a concurrent environment. Also user variables do not help, as I desire a global unique and incremented sequence number, not a counter within a single session.

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But, the combination of the timestamp and the id would always be unique. You can just concatenate those at query time. –  Michael Berkowski Dec 1 '13 at 15:33
    
@Michael: Not a bad idea :-) I had more of a sequence number in mind, but your suggestion will in fact solve the problem as well, thanks. –  chepp Dec 1 '13 at 15:38
    
@Michael: I'd love to upvote your comment, but don't have enough credit's yet. I think it should be the accepted answer. –  chepp Dec 1 '13 at 15:50
    
Ok, I'll put it below as an answer. –  Michael Berkowski Dec 1 '13 at 16:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Although a timestamp updated via ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP may not be unique by itself, when coupled with the id column (already auto_increment) you guarantee a unique value between them.

So, you may calculate the version in your query by simply concatenating the two values in any way that makes sense. For example: id_timestamp or id_unix_timestamp(timestamp).

If you have a great need to query that value with exceptional performance, consider creating a composite index across the two columns.

 ALTER TABLE yourtable ADD INDEX `idx_id_timestamp` (`id`, `timestamp`)

You can add a UNIQUE but it isn't absolutely necessary since the id guarantees that already as a primary key.

If absolutely necessary, an update trigger could be used to cache the concatenated value with each row into its own column, but that adds quite a lot of complexity and some duplication when you could normally produce it at query time and have the composite index available to query it otherwise.

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