Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm quite a beginner when it comes to the ternary operators, never worked with them before.

Code (it was simplified)

$output2 = '
<div>
    <div>
        <span>test text1</span>
        <div>
            '.(1 == 1) ? "yes" : "no" .'
            <span>test text 2</span>
        </div> 
    </div>
</div>';
echo $output2;

So the problem is, this code only outputs "yes" (only the correct or false if statement)

I tried with "" same problem, tried with different conditions, tried just outputing it, without variables. But the problem remains.

Thank you.

Sebastjan

share|improve this question
    
Well.. 1 does in fact equal 1, so yes should be returned. –  WillemLabu Dec 1 '13 at 16:44
    
yes, but it only returns "yes" and no "test text1" and "test text2" –  Sebastjan Dec 1 '13 at 16:45
    
Ah, I see what you mean now. –  WillemLabu Dec 1 '13 at 16:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Surround your ternary if with brackets, i.e.

$output2 = '
<div>
    <div>
        <span>test text1</span>
        <div>
            '.((1 == 1) ? "yes" : "no") .'
            <span>test text 2</span>
        </div> 
    </div>
</div>';
echo $output2;
share|improve this answer
    
thanks man, it works perfectly :) –  Sebastjan Dec 1 '13 at 16:49

In php ternary operator behaves strangely, in your case:

(1 == 1) ? "yes" : "no" .'<span>test text 2</span>...' 

yes is considered the first result, and "no" . <span>test text 2</span>... is the second result. To avoid such behaviour always use brackets

((1 == 1) ? "yes" : "no") .'<span>test text 2</span>...' // works correctly
share|improve this answer

Alexander's answer is correct, but I would go a little further and actually remove the ternary from the string.

$ternary = ($something == $somethingElse) ? "yes" : "no";

// Double brackets allows you to echo variables
//  without breaking the string up.
$output = "<div>$ternary</div>";

echo $output;

Doing it this way proves to be much easier to maintain, and reuse.


Here are a few uses for ternary operators. They're very powerful if you use them properly.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.