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I have such project, which includes 1.c 2.c and mygost.h files.

//mygost.h  looks this way

#ifndef MYGOST_H_
#define MYGOST_H_
#include <stdint.h>


uint8_t transl_table(uint8_t in, uint8_t n) {
return tbl[n][in];
}

const char *get_filename_ext(const char *filename) 
{
  const char *dot = strrchr(filename, '.');
  if(!dot || dot == filename) return "";
  return dot + 1;
}
#endif

//1.c 
#include <malloc.h>
#include "mygost.h"
// here we call defined before functions

//2.c 
#include <malloc.h>
#include "mygost.h"
// here we call defined before functions

If I include this header only in one .c file, everything will be fine. Otherwise I get Multiple definition error of const char *get_filename_ext(const char *filename) function and all other function in the header. In addition, I dont redefine these functions in a code at all. Don`t know how to fix this.

I use QNX Momentics Tool Suite, which has own compliler (http://www.qnx.com/products/tools/qnx-momentics.html), but it works like gcc as far as I know.

UPD1: Compiler gives such errors

Severity and Description    Path    Resource    Location    
2.c: multiple definition of `get_filename_ext'      GostQnx line 0

..........
make[2]:***[C:/ide-4.5-workspace/GostQnx/x86/o-g/GostQnx_g] Error1 GostQnx line 0
make[2]:***[C:/ide-4.5-workspace/GostQnx/x86/o/GostQnx] Error1 GostQnx  line 0
first defined here  GostQnx mygost.h    line 16
................

multiple definition of `get_filename_ext'GostQnx mygost.h   line 151  
..........

UPD2: adding static or inline don`t effect.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should not define a function in a .h file. The error is most likely the missing function prototype const char *get_filename_ext(const char *);

(edited following comment)

  //mygost.h  looks this way

  #ifndef MYGOST_H_
  #define MYGOST_H_
  #include <stdint.h>


  extern uint8_t transl_table(uint8_t in, uint8_t n);
  extern const char *get_filename_ext(const char *filename); 

  #endif

  //mygost.c  looks this way

  #include "mygost.h"


  extern uint8_t transl_table(uint8_t in, uint8_t n) {
  return tbl[n][in];
  }

  extern const char *get_filename_ext(const char *filename) 
  {
    const char *dot = strrchr(filename, '.');
    if(!dot || dot == filename) return "";
    return dot + 1;
  }

When you include in 1.c, the compiler declares the function and make an assumption on it's prototype since it is not defined. And does the same the second time it is included in 2.c. The usual way would be to declare a function prototype in mygosh.h, and put the actual function declaration in a mygosh.c containing the implementation details.

Bear in mind that I only rewrote according to your example (for example I did not correct the undeclared variable in trans1_table)

Having the full output from the compiler would help to be more precise. As the compiler and platform (ex: gcc 4.7 under ubuntu 12.04).

Also, I tried to compile your code under fedora 19 with gcc 4.7 and it does not compile because of some unknown types that are either defined elsewhere in your real project or because it could also be a cause of your problem. Try to rewrite as a self contained compilable example. If you want, you can check a gitorious project I started out a while ago for another stack overflow question you can look at for ideas.

https://gitorious.org/c-cli-rubix-cube

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1  
do you mean, that I should only declare functions in the header and define them mygost.c file ? But the problem is how should I do this ? What exactly should I write? –  Rocketq Dec 1 '13 at 18:34
    
Unless it's inline perhaps... –  Fiddling Bits Dec 1 '13 at 19:05
1  
@Rocketq Headers are for declarations, source files for definitions. Remember header inclusion is basically copy-paste, hence both 1.c and 2.c are defining those functions and they're colliding at the linking phase. –  Guido Dec 1 '13 at 19:27
1  
inline is probably the only exception to what @Guido said. –  Fiddling Bits Dec 1 '13 at 19:33
1  
@Rocketq, of course! Declare the functions in a header and define them in a source file, just like Sebastien described in this very answer. –  Guido Dec 1 '13 at 22:53

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