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Hi I have two versions of a class I've written, one uses a map, one uses two vectors:

    class NucleotideSequence{
private:
    std::string Name;
    std::vector<int> BasePos;
    std::vector<char> BaseChar;
public:
    NucleotideSequence(std::string name, std::vector<int> &bp, std::vector<char> &bases);
    std::string getName();
    char getBase(int pos); // get a base by it's position in the char array.
    char getAbBase(int abPos); // get a base by it's actual bp position.
};


class NucleotideSequence2{
private:
    std::string Name;
    std::map<int, char> Sequence;
public:
    NucleotideSequence2(std::string &name, std::map<int, char> &seq) throw(FormatError);
    std::string getName();
};

I then defined the constructors for them:

NucleotideSequence::NucleotideSequence(std::string name, std::vector<int> &bp, std::vector<char> &bases)
:Name(name), BasePos(bp), BaseChar(bases)
{
    for (std::vector<char>::iterator i = BaseChar.begin(); i != BaseChar.end(); i++) {
        switch (*i) {
            case 'A': case 'T': case 'C': case 'G': case '-': case 'N':
                break;
            case 'a':
                *i = 'A';
                break;
            case 't':
                *i = 'T';
                break;
            case 'c':
                *i = 'C';
                break;
            case 'g':
                *i = 'G';
                break;
            case 'n':
                *i = 'N';
                break;
            default:
                throw FormatError();
                break;
        }
    }
}

NucleotideSequence2::NucleotideSequence2(std::string &name, std::map<int, char> &seq) throw(FormatError)
: Name(name), Sequence(seq)
{
    for (std::map<int, char>::iterator i = Sequence.begin(); i != Sequence.end(); i++) {

        switch (i->second) {
            case 'A': case 'T': case 'C': case 'G': case '-': case 'N':
                break;
            case 'a':
                i->second = 'A';
                break;
            case 't':
                i->second = 'T';
                break;
            case 'c':
                i->second = 'C';
                break;
            case 'g':
                i->second = 'G';
                break;
            case 'n':
                i->second = 'N';
                break;
            default:
                throw FormatError();
                break;
        }
    }
}

These two constructors are called in two different functions:

NucleotideSequence Sequence_stream::get()
{
    if (FileStream.is_open() == false)
        throw StreamClosed(); // Make sure the stream is indeed open else throw an exception.
    if (FileStream.eof())
        throw FileEnd();
    char currentchar;
    int basepos = 0;
    std::string name;
    std::vector<char> sequence;
    std::vector<int> postn;
    currentchar = FileStream.get();
    if (FileStream.eof())
        throw FileEnd();
    if (currentchar != '>')
        throw FormatError();
    currentchar = FileStream.get();
    while(currentchar != '\n' && false == FileStream.eof())
    {
        name.append(1, currentchar);
        currentchar = FileStream.get();
    } // done getting names, now let's get the sequence.
    currentchar = FileStream.get();
    while(currentchar != '>' && false == FileStream.eof())
    {
        if(currentchar != '\n' && currentchar != ' '){
            basepos++;
            sequence.push_back(currentchar);
            postn.push_back(basepos);
        }
        currentchar = FileStream.get();
    }
    if(currentchar == '>')
    {
        FileStream.unget();
    }
    return NucleotideSequence(name, postn, sequence);
}


NucleotideSequence2 Sequence_stream::get2()
{
    if (FileStream.is_open() == false)
        throw StreamClosed(); // Make sure the stream is indeed open else throw an exception.
    if (FileStream.eof())
        throw FileEnd();
    char currentchar;
    int basepos = 0;
    std::string name;
    std::map<int, char> sequence;
    currentchar = FileStream.get();
    if (FileStream.eof())
        throw FileEnd();
    if (currentchar != '>')
        throw FormatError();
    currentchar = FileStream.get();
    while(currentchar != '\n' && false == FileStream.eof())
    {
        name.append(1, currentchar);
        currentchar = FileStream.get();
    } // done getting names, now let's get the sequence.
    currentchar = FileStream.get();
    while(currentchar != '>' && false == FileStream.eof())
    {
        if(currentchar != '\n' && currentchar != ' '){
            basepos++;
            sequence[basepos] = currentchar;
        }
        currentchar = FileStream.get();
    }
    if(currentchar == '>')
    {
        FileStream.unget();
    }
    return NucleotideSequence2(name, sequence);
}

Then these two functions can then be called from another function (which catches the exceptions: in case you are wondering about the uncaught throws).

The difference between the two class is one contains two vectors, whereas in another, the same info is contained in a map.

My question is: the first class and the 'get' that builds it works very quickly - almost instantly. Whereas the 'get2' which builds the second class (the one with the map) - is noticeably slower - just over 5 seconds.

Why is constructing the class with the map slower than constructing the one with the two vectors - you should see I've kept the constructors and the two get functions almost identical except for the addition of elements to vectors, or the addition of key value pairs to the map. So it is my suspicion that repeatedly pushing back to a vector is faster and more efficient than adding key value pairs i.e. mymap['newkey'] = 'newvalue'; repeatedly.

How can I speed up the map version?

Thanks, Ben.

share|improve this question

A vector performs one single allocation (if you tell it the required capacity in advance), or at the very most a small number of allocations. A map performs a separate dynamic allocation for every element.

You may like to experiment using a sorted vector of pairs, or perhaps a "flat map" (in Boost), or a btree-map (there's one in Google Code) and compare performances. Memory locality can make a dramatic difference, and if you don't need the strong iterator validity guarantees of a std::map you may well find a data structure that performs better.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll try some of these out - my predicament seems to be I have large data structures, so say I wanted to pick out a element in my class - with the two vectors I would guess to loop through the first vector till I match the value I want (equivalent to finding the key) and then using the position to get the value in the second vector. Here just using a map and giving it a key and getting the value out straight away is cleaner and better for larger structures, but the vectors are built quicker - as you say because of the allocations. – Ward9250 Dec 1 '13 at 19:19
    
Let's not forget either boost::stable_vector which allies the efficiency of allocation of the vector with the memory stability requirements of traditional node-based containers (list, set, map). – Matthieu M. Dec 1 '13 at 19:25
    
Out of the three - vectors, unordered_map, vector of pairs - vector of pairs I've actually timed as being the fastest - only slightly so than the two vectors. How would one efficiently get values from a vector of pairs using one of the values as a key? – Ward9250 Dec 1 '13 at 20:52
    
@Ward9250: With std::lower_bound, and keeping the vector sorted (in comparison order of the first pair element). – Kerrek SB Dec 1 '13 at 20:54
    
I've added a line in the constructor to make sure the vector is sorted: std::sort(Sequence.begin(), Sequence.end(), pairCompare); where pairCompare is defined: bool pairCompare(const std::pair<int, char>& firstElem, const std::pair<int, char>& secondElem) { return firstElem.first < secondElem.first; } – Ward9250 Dec 1 '13 at 22:06

How can I speed up the map version?

Try unordered_map instead of a regular map.

share|improve this answer

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