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I have a few basic questions about 2D arrays, e.g.:

double bn[NNODES][NBASIS]

1-How is the declaration in C? And in Fortran?

2-The first [] is for the rows number and the second for columns, both for C and Fortran?

3- When using bn, e.g. bn[i][j], the "i" index is for rows and "j" is for columns? Both in C and Fortran?

4- How is the write/print function (both for C and Fortran) only for one (e.g. i=15) and entire row?

Thanks

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This look like problems for beginning programming class. This is not the place to solve your programming class problems. – innoSPG Dec 3 '13 at 14:34

Some of the examples are for a square matrix which obscures one issue. C and Fortran uses different memory layouts for multi-dimensions arrays. C is row-major, while Fortran is column major. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Row-major_order. When working between the languages, it can be convenient to deal with this in the declarations, e.g., in C:

double array [20][10];

and in Fortran, using the iso_c_binding intrinsic module:

real (C_DOUBLE), dimension (10,20) :: array
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1-How is the declaration in C? And in Fortran?

In C, you declare a static array as such: int arr[row][col];

2-The first [] is for the rows number and the second for columns, both for C and Fortran?

It doesn't really matter if you consider the first or second subscript of a 2D array the row or column subscript. What matters is that you stay within bounds. arr[0][0] to arr[row - 1][col - 1].

3- When using bn, e.g. bn[i][j], the "i" index is for rows and "j" is for columns? Both in C and Fortran?

See answer 2.

4- How is the write/print function (both for C and Fortran) only for one (e.g. i=15) and entire row?

Use for loops to access a single row or column in the array. For example, to access all the elements in row 0:

for(int c = 0; c < col; ++)
    printf("%d\n", arr[0][c]); 
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@VladimirF Sure, it matters if you're writing something that needs to be compatible with someone else's implementation of 2D arrays, but the question is whether [row] and [column] subscripts are set in stone or not. – Fiddling Bits Dec 1 '13 at 21:36
1  
Not somone else's, MATMUL is defined in the Fortran standard. – Vladimir F Dec 1 '13 at 21:38

1-How is the declaration in C? And in FORTRAN?

In C

double bn[10][10];  

In FORTRAN

double precision bn(10, 10)  

2-The first [] is for the rows number and the second for columns, both for C and Fortran?

Yes.

3- When using bn, e.g. bn[i][j], the "i" index is for rows and "j" is for columns? Both in C and Fortran?

Yes.

4- How is the write/print function (both for C and Fortran) only for one (e.g. i=15) and entire row?

In FORTRAN

do, i=1:10
    do, j=1:10
        write (*,*) bn(i,j)
    enddo
enddo 

In C

for(i = 0; i < 10, i++)
    for(i = 0; i < 10, i++)  
          printf("%f", bn[i][j]);
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4  
double precision bn(10)(10) - not so much, try double precision bn(10,10). And to print row i write(*,*) bn(i,:) will suffice, no loop across the columns necessary. – High Performance Mark Dec 1 '13 at 20:36
    
@HighPerformanceMark; That was a typo. And yes for a fixed row you can do this. – haccks Dec 1 '13 at 22:54

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