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A simple example of computation with inductive datatypes using Yices is:

(define-type T (datatype c1
                     c2
                     (c3 val::bool)))

(define x1::T)
(define x2::T)
(assert (/= x1 x2))
(check) 

and the corresponding output is:

sat
(= x1 c1)
(= (c3 false) x2)

This example is solved using Z3-SMT-LIB using the following code

(declare-datatypes () ((T c1  ( c3 (T Bool)))))
(declare-fun x1 () T)
(declare-fun x2 () T)
(assert (not (= x2 x1)))
(check-sat)
(get-model)

and the corresponding output is

sat 
(model 
(define-fun x2 () T (c3 false)) 
(define-fun x1 () T c1) 
)     

Run this example online here

As it is observed Yices and Z3 produce the same results.

Other example:

Yices:

(define-type T (datatype c1
                     c2
                     (c3 val::bool)))

(define x1::T)
(define x2::T)
(define x3::T)
(define x4::T)
(assert (/= x1 x2))
(assert (/= x1 x3))
(assert (/= x1 x4))
(assert (/= x2 x3))
(assert (/= x2 x4))
(assert (/= x3 x4))
(check)


sat
(= x1 c1)
(= x3 c2)
(= (c3 false) x4)
(= (c3 true)  x2)

Z3:

(declare-datatypes () ((T c1 c2  ( c3 (T Bool)))))
(declare-fun x1 () T)
(declare-fun x2 () T)
(declare-fun x3 () T)
(declare-fun x4 () T)
(assert (not (= x4 x3)))
(assert (not (= x4 x2)))
(assert (not (= x4 x1)))
(assert (not (= x3 x2)))
(assert (not (= x3 x1)))
(assert (not (= x2 x1)))
(check-sat)
(get-model)


sat 
(model 
(define-fun x3 () T c2) 
(define-fun x2 () T (c3 false)) 
(define-fun x1 () T c1) 
(define-fun x4 () T (c3 true)) 
)

Run this example online here

As it is observed in this example Yices and Z3 produce different results.

Other example: Natural numbers as an inductive type:

Yices

(define-type Nat (datatype zero

                     (succ val::Nat)))

(define x1::Nat)
(define x2::Nat)
(define x3::Nat)
(assert (/= x1 x2))
(assert (/= x1 x3))
(assert (/= x2 x3))
(check)


sat
(= zero x1)
(= (succ x2) x3)
(= (succ x1) x2)

Z3

(declare-datatypes () ((Nat zero (succ (Nat Nat)))))
(declare-fun x1 () Nat)
(declare-fun x2 () Nat)
(declare-fun x3 () Nat)
(assert  (not (= x1 x2)))
(assert  (not (= x1 x3)))
(assert  (not (= x2 x3)))
(check-sat)
(get-model)


sat
(model 
(define-fun x3 () Nat (succ (succ (succ zero)))) 
(define-fun x2 () Nat (succ zero)) 
(define-fun x1 () Nat zero) 
)

Run this example online here

As it is observed in this example Yices and Z3 produce different results.

The questions are;

  1. How to write the Z3 code with the aim to obtain the same results that are obtained with Yices.

  2. How to obtain all possible models using both Z3 and Yices.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your example has an infinite number of models. Z3 and Yices produce different models, but the solutions produced by both of them are correct.

Z3 and Yices use slightly different decision procedures for inductive datatypes. This is why they produce different models. There is no way to force them to always produce the same solution for an input set of assertions that has more than one model.

Regarding enumerating all possible models, we can use the Z3 API. See this post:

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