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#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    long long n, k;

    cin >> n >> k;

    int num, count = 0;

    do{
        n--;
        cin >> num;
        if (num > 99 && (num % 10) % k == 0){
            //cout << num << endl;
            count++;
        }
        else if(num < 100 && (num % k) == 0){
            //cout << num << endl;
            count++;
        }
    }while(n);

    cout << count << endl;

    return 0;
}

I'm writing a program to check if a specific number is divisible by specific number inputted by user.

n = amount of numbers inputted k = the number to check if numbers are divisible

My program works quite good so far, but it exceeds on time limit. Is there any faster algorithm or code than this to check if a number is divisible with another specific number?

Link : http://www.codechef.com/problems/INTEST/

share|improve this question
    
Why do you do something different for num > 99? –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 1 '13 at 21:53
1  
"check if a number is divisible with another specific number?" What's wrong with num % num2 == 0 ? –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Dec 1 '13 at 21:53
    
@OliCharlesworth I check the last digit only for numbers bigger than 99. –  user3002211 Dec 1 '13 at 21:54
2  
The slowest bit here is the I/O. What are the values for N and K? And is this some online programming 'test'? –  Roddy Dec 1 '13 at 21:57
3  
"The purpose of this problem is to verify whether the method you are using to read input data is sufficiently fast to handle problems branded with the enormous Input/Output warning". So in other words, you need faster I/O, not a faster divide test. –  Roddy Dec 1 '13 at 22:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all, the problem here is reading numbers from the input in a fast way, not doing the division. With that in mind, here is some code for fast reading:

vector<char> buffer(n * 10); // allocate a large buffer
cin.read(&buffer[0], buffer.size()); // fill the buffer with chars from input
buffer.resize(cin.gcount()); // cut buffer size to number of chars actually read
...

This reads the whole input file (note the buffer size that is limited by each number having less than 10 digits).

Then, convert the sequence of characters into numbers, and check each number for divisibility by k (num % k != 0, as others have noted). The code for that can be found in the "complex" solution that you posted (it occupies just 1 line of code there).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for actually correct answer + suggestion on how to solve it. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Dec 1 '13 at 22:23
    
This only reads sizeof(char*) characters. Likely no more than 8. –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 1 '13 at 22:38
    
@BenjaminLindley Yeah. Will fix. –  anatolyg Dec 1 '13 at 22:41

Modulo operator (%) is what you want. Example:

if (k != 0)
    return n % k == 0;   

or for the space sticklers:

if (k != 0)
    return !(n % k);

Modulo returns the remainder of the division between the two numbers, for example 5 % 2 returns 1. If the remainder is 0, the numbers are divisible (IE 4 % 2 will return 0).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulo_operation

share|improve this answer
1  
True, but it's exceeding the time limit for some reason, it's not fast enough? –  user3002211 Dec 1 '13 at 21:54
3  
Why the if, the else and all the boilerplate? return n%k == 0. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Dec 1 '13 at 21:54
2  
-1 for the ridiculous if (bool_expr) return true else return false –  ScarletAmaranth Dec 1 '13 at 21:55
1  
You were typing quickly so you made it longer, I see. –  ScarletAmaranth Dec 1 '13 at 21:56
1  
A minor issue, but you should check that k != 0... –  user268396 Dec 1 '13 at 21:57

Instead of this code snippet

    cin >> num;
    if (num > 99 && (num % 10) % k == 0){
        //cout << num << endl;
        count++;
    }
    else if(num < 100 && (num % k) == 0){
        //cout << num << endl;
        count++;
    }

You could write simply

    cin >> num;
    count += num % k == 0;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this little twist, I do appreciate it and I'll try to use that in the future. :) –  user3002211 Dec 1 '13 at 22:04

The point of the 'problem' is that the standard I/O libraries for most languages are very general purpose, and therefore may not be the optimal tools for reading or writing data when the format is well defined and performance is critical.

In this case, you're using the library functions to read from IO streams, which are a highly abstracted from the underlying storage system. Typically, the closer you get to the hardware, the faster your code will run.

I'd start by trying to use the C file IO functions like fopen and fread to read a large chunk of binary data from the file into memory, then process that memory 'in situ' scanning for numbers and counting the correct matches. Loop until theres no more lines to process, and remember it's much more efficent to read large blocks of data that small ones.

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Instead of using if ( n % k != 0 ) use, int quotient = n/k; if( quotient * k == n )

The modulus operator is slower than the second approach. (It took me 4.5 seconds to run the code with modulus operator and 1 second with the second approach)

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