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What is the fastest and most efficient way to check for Internet connectivity in .NET?

share|improve this question
    
what to you want to 'check'? – manuel aldana Jan 9 '10 at 0:49
2  
If the user has an internet conecction. If the user can connect to the internet. In order to send an email log. – Mohit Deshpande Jan 9 '10 at 0:52
8  
Just send the email. If the user's not connected, you'll likely receive some kind of exception (which you would probably have to handle anyway). – Seth Jan 9 '10 at 0:57
10  
Also, note that there is no way to check if the user is connected to the internet; all you can tell is if they were connected in the past. Suppose you had a method: "bool c = IsConnected(); if (c) { DoSomething(); } " -- between the call to IsConnected and DoSomething, the wireless network router might have been unplugged. IsConnected really should be called WasRecentlyConnected. – Eric Lippert Jan 9 '10 at 15:47

13 Answers 13

up vote 109 down vote accepted

Something like this should work.

System.Net.WebClient

public static bool CheckForInternetConnection()
{
    try
    {
        using (var client = new WebClient())
        {
            using (var stream = client.OpenRead("http://www.google.com"))
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
    }
    catch
    {
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
7  
This is probably better than pinging Google, because I think we have no guarantee that Google continues to respond to pings. On the other hand, I cannot image a world where www.google.com does not return some HTML :) – Daniel Vassallo Jan 9 '10 at 1:01
1  
@Daniel: true on the one hand, but on the other hand, actually downloading the website is a little overhead imo – Leo Jan 9 '10 at 1:05
5  
Either way, no reason to pull the 4KB back - just use client.OpenRead(url) instead. If it doesn't throw an exception then it was able to connect. – Josh M. Mar 27 '11 at 16:50
8  
That's actually not so efficient. Using that makes my program start over 1 minute if there's no internet. Probably due to trying to resolve DNS. Pinging 8.8.8.8 (google dns) changed it to 3 seconds. – MadBoy Jun 14 '13 at 8:58
6  
@dbasnett Somewhere I read a report that 76% of statistics are made up on the spot. – Niall May 14 '14 at 10:30

There is absolutely no way you can reliably check if there is an internet connection or not (I assume you mean access to the internet).

You can, however, request resources that are virtually never offline, like pinging google.com or something similar. I think this would be efficient.

try { 
    Ping myPing = new Ping();
    String host = "google.com";
    byte[] buffer = new byte[32];
    int timeout = 1000;
    PingOptions pingOptions = new PingOptions();
    PingReply reply = myPing.Send(host, timeout, buffer, pingOptions);
    return (reply.Status == IPStatus.Success);
}
catch (Exception) {
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
6  
+1 "There is absolutely no way you can reliably check if there is an internet connection" – woz Mar 19 '13 at 18:05
2  
All this does is check that google is up when you pinged it. If the very next instant after your successful ping the internet goes down then what? There is no point in checking before doing. – dbasnett May 14 '13 at 15:36
8  
And how does this contradict with the main statement of my answer? – Leo May 14 '13 at 19:19
2  
For who is confused which answer is the best (like I was), I think this is the best answer because here you have control over the timeout test connection unlike the other answers. – Jacob Oct 15 '14 at 16:02
2  
I would like to reiterate the point that Beware - many schools and offices block the ping protocol. If you are using this method for an application that will be used by clients I would advise against this method of checking internet – user1 Apr 29 '15 at 11:26

Instead of checking, just perform the action (web request, mail, ftp, etc.) and be prepared for the request to fail, which you have to do anyway, even if your check was successful.

Consider the following:

1 - check, and it is OK
2 - start to perform action 
3 - network goes down
4 - action fails
5 - lot of good your check did

If the network is down your action will fail just as rapidly as a ping, etc.

1 - start to perform action
2 - if the net is down(or goes down) the action will fail
share|improve this answer
3  
Right! Just do it - but be prepared for all outcomes. – Colonel Panic Feb 28 '13 at 15:58
1  
Consider the following: You need to Do Something if the network is down for x amout of time (e.g. tracelog, router reset) – Abir Apr 1 '15 at 13:03
    
Not the OP, but the reason I want to do this is to AVOID THE DEFAULT 100 SECOND TIMEOUT if Internet connectivity isn't available. The HTTP request is done on a background thread, so the UI thread isn't being blocked, but my app can't exit until the background thread returns from the HTTP request and terminates. Rather than try to find some "happy medium" timeout value, I'd like to just avoid the request altogether if I knew the Internet connection was down. – Scott Smith May 11 '15 at 17:46
    
My point was that we can't account for when the remote service might become available / unavailable. Also, what about sites that don't respond to pings? – dbasnett May 12 '15 at 12:02

A test for internet connection by pinging Google:

new Ping().Send("www.google.com.mx").Status == IPStatus.Success
share|improve this answer
6  
A description to go along with this answer would be beneficial to more people than just the original author of the question. – Boeckm Nov 13 '12 at 18:56
9  
Beware - many schools and offices block the ping protocol. Silly, I know. – Colonel Panic Feb 28 '13 at 15:57

NetworkInterface.GetIsNetworkAvailable is very unreliable. just have some vmware or other lan connection and it will return wrong result. Also about Dns.GetHostEntry method i were just concerned about whether test url might be blocked in the environment where my application going to deploy.

So Another way i found out is using InternetGetConnectedState method My code is

[System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("wininet.dll")]
private extern static bool InternetGetConnectedState(out int Description, int ReservedValue);

public static bool CheckNet()
{
     int desc;
     return InternetGetConnectedState(out desc, 0);         
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Till now, this works perfectly for me. – Suvendu Shekhar Giri Apr 29 '15 at 10:23
    
During testing, I found that InternetGetConnectedState returned true when VMWare player was installed (internet disconnected). Had to disable it in Control Panel\Network and Internet\Network Connections (VMNet1 and VMNet8). – HockeyJ Jun 10 '15 at 9:57
    
Ok Justin Oringer.though i have checked it but have to verify again – Kamran Shahid Jun 10 '15 at 10:01

Does not solve the problem of network going down between checking and running your code but is fairly reliable

public static bool IsAvailableNetworkActive()
        {
            // only recognizes changes related to Internet adapters
            if (System.Net.NetworkInformation.NetworkInterface.GetIsNetworkAvailable())
            {
                // however, this will include all adapters -- filter by opstatus and activity
                NetworkInterface[] interfaces = System.Net.NetworkInformation.NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces();
                return (from face in interfaces
                        where face.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up
                        where (face.NetworkInterfaceType != NetworkInterfaceType.Tunnel) && (face.NetworkInterfaceType != NetworkInterfaceType.Loopback)
                        select face.GetIPv4Statistics()).Any(statistics => (statistics.BytesReceived > 0) && (statistics.BytesSent > 0));
            }

            return false;
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Great idea, but like you said might not be perfect. You could cache the bytes sent/received as well for future checks. Still not perfect though. – Todd Oct 5 '15 at 5:51

I disagree with people who are stating: "What's the point in checking for connectivity before performing a task, as immediately after the check the connection may be lost". Surely there is a degree of uncertainty in many programming tasks we as developers undertake, but reducing the uncertainty to a level of acceptance is part of the challenge.

I recently ran into this problem making an application which including a mapping feature which linked to an on-line tile server. This functionality was to be disabled where a lack of internet connectivity was noted.

Some of the responses on this page were very good, but did however cause a lot of performance issues such as hanging, mainly in the case of the absence of connectivity.

Here is the solution that I ended up using, with the help of some of these answers and my colleagues:

         // Insert this where check is required, in my case program start
         ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(CheckInternetConnectivity);
    }

    void CheckInternetConnectivity(object state)
    {
        if (System.Net.NetworkInformation.NetworkInterface.GetIsNetworkAvailable())
        {
            using (WebClient webClient = new WebClient())
            {
                webClient.CachePolicy = new System.Net.Cache.RequestCachePolicy(System.Net.Cache.RequestCacheLevel.BypassCache);
                webClient.Proxy = null;
                webClient.OpenReadCompleted += webClient_OpenReadCompleted;
                webClient.OpenReadAsync(new Uri("<url of choice here>"));
            }
        }
    }

    volatile bool internetAvailable = false; // boolean used elsewhere in code

    void webClient_OpenReadCompleted(object sender, OpenReadCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.Error == null)
        {
            internetAvailable = true;
            Dispatcher.Invoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal, new Action(() =>
            {
                // UI changes made here
            }));
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
public static bool HasConnection()
{
    try
    {
        System.Net.IPHostEntry i = System.Net.Dns.GetHostEntry("www.google.com");
        return true;
    }
    catch
    {
        return false;
    }
}

That works

share|improve this answer
31  
If you have google's IP in your DNS cache, it won't send a DNS request, so it could return true even if you're not connected – Thomas Levesque Jan 9 '10 at 2:19

I hope this 'll help you.

bool bb = System.Net.NetworkInformation.NetworkInterface.GetIsNetworkAvailable();

        if (bb == true)
            MessageBox.Show("Internet connections are available");
        else
            MessageBox.Show("Internet connections are not available");
share|improve this answer
1  
Can you add information relating to the speed of this and how this is better than other solutions posted. This will help your answer in fully addressing the question. – Ren Apr 23 '13 at 11:34
5  
The problem with this option is that bb would still be true even when the network is not connected to the internet. – Bob Kruithof May 17 '13 at 19:10
2  
While it's true that this doesn't directly answer the question, I think it's still useful to use GetIsNetworkAvailable as a pre-check before attempting to ping Google etc. – Ben Hughes Oct 10 '13 at 0:52

I wouldn't think it's impossible, just not straightforward.

I've built something like this, and yes it's not perfect, but the first step is essential: to check if there's any network connectivity. The Windows Api doesn't do a great job, so why not do a better job?

    bool NetworkIsAvailable()
    {
        var all = System.Net.NetworkInformation.NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces();
        foreach (var item in all)
        {
            if (item.NetworkInterfaceType == NetworkInterfaceType.Loopback)
                continue;
            if (item.Name.ToLower().Contains("virtual") || item.Description.ToLower().Contains("virtual"))
                continue; //Exclude virtual networks set up by VMWare and others
            if (item.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up)
            {
                return true;
            }
        }

        return false;
    }

It's pretty simple, but it really helps improve the quality of the check, especially when you want to check various proxy configurations.

So:

  • Check whether there's network connectivity (make this really good, maybe even have logs sent back to developers when there are false positives to improve the NetworkIsAvailable function)
  • HTTP Ping
  • (Cycle through Proxy configurations with HTTP Pings on each)
share|improve this answer

Another option is the Network List Manager API which is available for Vista and Windows 7. MSDN article here. In the article is a link to download code samples which allow you to do this:

    AppNetworkListUser nlmUser = new AppNetworkListUser();
    Console.WriteLine("Is the machine connected to internet? " + nlmUser.NLM.IsConnectedToInternet.ToString());

Be sure to add a reference to Network List 1.0 Type Library from the COM tab... which will show up as NETWORKLIST.

share|improve this answer
2  
eeeeww. Using COM hell in .NET? – jgauffin Jun 29 '14 at 8:16

bool connection = NetworkInterface.GetIsNetworkAvailable();

    if (connection == true)
        MessageBox.Show("Internet connections are available");
    else
        MessageBox.Show("Internet connections are not available");
share|improve this answer
1  
This is the same as this answer and, like that answer, doesn't give any explanation as to why it's any better than the other options. – ahruss Jul 30 '14 at 20:07

SOLUTION: If you want to notify the user/take action whenever a network/connection change occur. Use NLM API

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/34650/How-to-use-the-Windows-NLM-API-to-get-notified-of

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee264321(VS.85).aspx

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