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I am trying to create something like the following

 ------------------------------------------
|                 div 1                    |
|         __________________________       |
|        | div2 on top of div1/div3|       |
---------|-------------------------|-------
|        |        div2             |       |
|        |_________________________|       |
|  div3  |                         | div3  |
|        |        div4             |       |
|        |                         |       |

This is what I have so far..

<body>
   <div id='div1'></div>
   <div id='container'>
       <div id='div2'></div>
       <div id='div4'></div>
   </div>
   <div id='div3'></div>   
</body>

css
body{
   width:980px;
   margin:0 auto;
   position:relative;
   background-color: #EEEEEE;  
}

#container{
   position:absolute;
   top:15px;
}

#div1{
  background-color: red;
  height: 200px;
  width: 1200px;
}

The problem is I want div1 to extend the whole length instead of 980px here. I also want my div2 and div4 in the middle of the page. In my css the div1 will only be like

 -------------------------
|         div 1           |
|_________________________|
| div2 on top of div1/div3|
|-------------------------|
|        div2             |
|_________________________|
|                         |
|        div4             |
|                         |

Can anyone help me about it? Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Josh Crozier, Geek Num 88, tjameson, Chris Haas, Donal Fellows Dec 5 '13 at 14:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
See the answer I gave to a very similar question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/20318869/… –  koenpeters Dec 2 '13 at 0:56
2  
@koenp That question was asked by him:D –  totymedli Dec 2 '13 at 1:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Live Demo

I added background-color and height just for the visibility. The idea was that you can create your div1 and div3 and you just absolutely position a 100% width container a bit lower than the relative div1. Than just add div2 and div4 with a smaller relative width like 80% to the container.

HTML

<div id='div1'></div>
<div id='container'>
    <div id='div2'></div>
    <div id='div4'></div>
</div>
<div id='div3'></div>  

CSS

#container {
    position: absolute;
    top: 100px;
    width: 100%;
}
#div1 {
    background-color: red;
    height: 200px;
    position: relative;
}
#div2 {
    background-color: blue;
    height: 200px;
    width: 80%;
    margin: 0 auto;
}
#div3 {
    background-color: green;
    height: 400px;
}
#div4 {
    background-color: yellow;
    height: 200px;
    width: 80%;
    margin: 0 auto;
}

About your second question. Unfortunately you can't make div3 to go as far as div4 in pure CSS, because the container is taken out from the document flow when you give it an absolute position, so you can't create relative positioning according to it. However you can do the following hacks:

Manual calculation

You have to calculate the heights by hand. div4's height is 800px and has a 100px offset so div3 has to be 900px tall. Don't forget to add this too:

body{ margin: 0px; }

Background hack

If div3 has a fix color, you can set your body's color to the same with a zero margin:

body{
    background-color: green;
    margin: 0px;
}

JavasScript

You can simply get and set the height of the <div>s via JavaScript.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much. I have another question. How to extend my div3 height to as far as div4 goes. div4 could be dynamic height. I have updated your fd. jsfiddle.net/CuN7A/1 +1 though –  FlyingCat Dec 2 '13 at 1:08
    
@FlyingCat I don't think you can do that with this DOM. But I edited my answer with a few workarounds you can try. –  totymedli Dec 2 '13 at 1:26

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