Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two ArrayList<ArrayList<String>>'s thant are the same size. The following code checks to see if the corresponding ArrayLists have any elements that are equal. If they do, they are both shuffled and the program rechecks and repeats.

boolean b=true;
int counter=0;
while(b==true)
{
   for(int i=0; i<arraylist1.size(); i++)
   {
       for(int j=0; j<arraylist2.size(); j++)
       {
           for(String s1: arraylist1.get(i))
           {
               for(String s2: arraylist2.get(j))
               {
                  if(s1.equals(s2))
                  {
                     counter++;
                  }
               }      
           }
       }
   }

   if(counter==0)
   {
       b=false;
   }
   else
   {
       long random = System.nanoTime();
       Collections.shuffle(arraylist1, new Random(random));

       long random2 = System.nanoTime();
       Collections.shuffle(arraylist2, new Random(random2));

       counter=0;
   }           
}  

What I know the problem is NOT: I know it is NOT the case that the two ArrayLists must have corresponding ArrayLists with the same element (i.e., there IS a shuffling of the ArrayLists such that all corresponding ArrayLists will have different elements). I also know it's not computational time.

What I think the problem may be: I think there is something inherently "unrandom" with the shuffling method I call, but honestly, I have no idea why this is not working. In fact, when I do this program with the code b=false at the end (to take me out of the loop no matter what and see how arraylist1 and arraylist2 compare) the ArrayLists are most of the time (correspondingly) different! Yet the program ALWAYS runs into an infinite loop despite this!

share|improve this question
3  
What exactly do you expect to happen here? Shuffling the lists isn't going to change the fact that they share a common element. Of course it results in an infinite loop; you've done nothing to break the condition. –  Chris Hayes Dec 2 '13 at 0:55
    
"Having an infinite loop for no reason" - as a general rule of thumb, when you're not sure whether the bug exists in your code, or in the Java Libraries, go with your code. Libraries are pretty damn good –  torquestomp Dec 2 '13 at 1:02
    
Since you are doing a lot of comparing I would use type List<Set<String>>. This way you don't have to check element by element, only the intersections of sets. –  bcorso Dec 2 '13 at 1:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems like you want to compare strings in equivalent positions, not ALL strings - as Chris Hayes said, shuffling will do nothing to prevent s1 and s2 from being equal, they'll just be in different positions. It sounds like you need to be doing something like this instead:

for (int i = 0; i < arraylist1.size(); i++) {
  List<String> list1 = arraylist1.get(i);
  List<String> list2 = arraylist2.get(i);

  // Check if the two lists have any elements in common
  for (String s1 : list1) {
    if (list2.contains(s1)) {
      counter++;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I see... I could just drop my j's so I only check at the i positions. Darn I hate when I miss simple things like this. But thanks :) –  user3000877 Dec 2 '13 at 1:06
    
I've also added a very similar answer as you but using sets. If you consolidate my answer into yours, i'll take mine down and upvote you. –  bcorso Dec 2 '13 at 1:35
for(int i=0; i<listOfSets1.size(); i++){
    Set<String> set1 = new HashSet<String>(listOfSets1.get(i));
    Set<String> set2 = listOfSets2.get(i);

    // retainAll gives destructive intersection of set1 and set2
    if( !set1.retainAll(set2).isEmpty() )
        break;
}
// do something more than shuffle

Instead of using List<List<String>> use List<Set<String>>. This will allow you to do comparisons of two sets in O(n) instead of O(n2).

The O(n2) vs O(n) of List and Set respectively stems from the fact that it takes O(n) time to tell if an element is in a List and only O(1) to tell if an element is in a Set.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.